267-269 Browning Street. Bathurst, New South Wales

Bathurst is one of those rare Australian cities where you’ll find terrace houses on almost every street near the centre of town. Its also a place where you’ll find out of the way terraces like this pair located opposite the historic Bathurst Gaol complex some 3 kilometres from the city centre. While there is much information on the history of the prison complex constructed between 1886-1888 to the plans of architect James Barnet, little is to be found on this Queen Anne styled double storey pair with its prominent gables was presumably built later, possibly in the 1890s. It is likely that these houses provided accommodation to workers at the gaol complex.1

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  1. pg 17. Bathurst Conservation Area Review. B. J. Hickson Architect and Heritage Adviser in association page with Bathurst Regional Council. September 2007

58-60 Raglan Street. Daylesford, Victoria

Situated just under a kilometre from both the main street and railway station of what is Australia’s most popular spa town is this very rare pair of single storey double fronted Victorian terraces.

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Bowen Terrace: 3-25 Bathurst Road. Orange, New South Wales.

Bowen Terrace is one of the longest double storey rows you’ll find in Australia but what is unusual is its location, situated in a regional city.  Built in 1876 for Henry Thomas Bowen1 to the design of architect John Hale2, it is also a fine row of houses architecturally with its long uninterrupted hipped roofspan (except for its elegantly placed chimneys), central parapet and open grille cast iron columns.

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  1. Australian Heritage Database record 904
  2. Heritage Council NSW

Archbishop’s Row: 18-32 Catherine Street, Subiaco. Perth, Western Australia

Subiaco is probably best known for its cricket and Australian rules stadium, though just around the corner are some excellent examples of terraced housing. Built in 1904, this row of eight Italianate style terrace homes presents as two rows of four homes and is significant on a number of accounts.  Firstly it is a rare architectural bearer of the emblem of the black swan, a symbol of Western

Australia (formerly the Swan River colony) which appears on the two centre pediments of each row. It is not known where the name originated.1 The row also features a rare cast iron balustrade panel and is a late follower of a style made popular in the eastern states during the Victorian era.

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  1.  City of Subiaco walking tours

Railway barracks. Lot 3 Young Street. Albury, New South Wales

The railway barracks at Albury is an important heritage registered row of 8 cottages built in 1890 as temporary rest houses for coach staff1 and believed to be the oldest of its kind remaining in Australia.

Currently in derelict condition with extensive boardings and graffiti it is protected on the NSW Heritage register. As part of the ongoing Albury railway station redevelopment urban renewal project it is being preserved for future adaptive reuse.

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  1. Albury Railway Precinct. NSW Heritage

248-252 Sloane Street. Goulburn, New South Wales

The first in our regional series on Goulburn in New South Wales, this impressive row of three impressive row of three consisting of two triple storey with attic and one single storey currently operates as the Alpine Heritage Motel. It was once a symmetrical arrangement of four terrace houses built in 1872 and modified in 1880. In 1893, the separate houses were conjoined to become a temperance hotel known as “Metropolitan Coffee Palace”1 and later “Stock’s Coffee Palace”.2 The terrace to the left was demolished at a later date and an attic level was added during conversion to accommodation in the 1990s.

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  1. Goulburn Herald.Friday 22 September 1893. pg2
  2. Alpine Heritage Hotel. About Us. Accessed 17/08/2014

Horbury Terrace: 171-173 Macquarie Street. Sydney, New South Wales

Once in a row of either seven or eight, this pair is all that remains of the Georgian revival (or Colonnial Regency) styled Horbury Terrace. Named after Horbury in Yorkshire England, which was the home of owner Thomas Holt it was built for Ouseley Condell. The houses were triple storey with basements. Details of its construction vary by source with some sources quoting a construction date of 18361 while the official plaque on the building from the Royal Australian Historical Society states 1842, engravings of it date to 1848.2

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  1. Howells, T. , Morris, M. Terrace Houses in Australia. Lansdowne Publishing, Sydney. 1999. pg 29.
  2. RAHS


Recent Discussion
  • dave: I live here. The interiors are amazing. 4.2 meter high ceilings highlighted by Original pressed tin roofing....
  • Brian Marshall: An ancestor of mine, Elizabeth Corneille, married Robert Williamson Stanger at 5 Granite Tce on 10...
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