Railway barracks. Lot 3 Young Street. Albury, New South Wales

The railway barracks at Albury is an important heritage registered row of 8 cottages built in 1890 as temporary rest houses for coach staff1 and believed to be the oldest of its kind remaining in Australia.

Currently in derelict condition with extensive boardings and graffiti it is protected on the NSW Heritage register. As part of the ongoing Albury railway station redevelopment urban renewal project it is being preserved for future adaptive reuse.

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  1. Albury Railway Precinct. NSW Heritage

248-252 Sloane Street. Goulburn, New South Wales

The first in our regional series on Goulburn in New South Wales, this impressive row of three impressive row of three consisting of two triple storey with attic and one single storey currently operates as the Alpine Heritage Motel. It was once a symmetrical arrangement of four terrace houses built in 1872 and modified in 1880. In 1893, the separate houses were conjoined to become a temperance hotel known as “Metropolitan Coffee Palace”1 and later “Stock’s Coffee Palace”.2 The terrace to the left was demolished at a later date and an attic level was added during conversion to accommodation in the 1990s.

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  1. Goulburn Herald.Friday 22 September 1893. pg2
  2. Alpine Heritage Hotel. About Us. Accessed 17/08/2014

Horbury Terrace: 171-173 Macquarie Street. Sydney, New South Wales

Once in a row of either seven or eight, this pair is all that remains of the Georgian revival (or Colonnial Regency) styled Horbury Terrace. Named after Horbury in Yorkshire England, which was the home of owner Thomas Holt it was built for Ouseley Condell. The houses were triple storey with basements. Details of its construction vary by source with some sources quoting a construction date of 18361 while the official plaque on the building from the Royal Australian Historical Society states 1842, engravings of it date to 1848.2

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  1. Howells, T. , Morris, M. Terrace Houses in Australia. Lansdowne Publishing, Sydney. 1999. pg 29.
  2. RAHS

57-71 Napier Street, Essendon. Melbourne, Victoria

This impressive row of eight double storey boom style polychrome terraces, captured by Alastair Lamont, is situated close to the “Windy Hill” Essendon football ground (home of AFL’s Essendon Bombers). Suprisingly for such a rare substantial suburban row, these homes are not even afforded local heritage protection under the Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme.1  Though they appear to be generally well looked after and highly sought after.

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  1. Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme

Pembridge Terrace: 49-55 Stevenson Place. Newcastle, New South Wales

Central Newcastle has some distinctive gems of terrace housing and this one, built in 1900, and situated on the corner of Stevenson Place and Telford Street with views over the foreshore park and the Hunter River is definitely one of them. The eclectic Anglo-Dutch, Queen-Anne and Mannerist styled red brick terrace likely named for the village in Herefordshire England, has a number of quite quirky features including the way it addresses its corner site, art-noveau styled signwriting and mannerist elements.

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Wilson’s Terrace: 129-135 High Street, Prahran. Melbourne, Victoria

This row of four double storey Victorian filligree terraces has been adaptively used as professional suites. Given the lack of current heritage protection offered (as of 2014 it is not covered by a heritage overlay under the Stonnington planning Scheme1. Given the position of the signage on the segmental arch of the parapet which bears the name “Wilson’s Terrace”, one would think this terrace was originally a row of five with two houses on either side of the mid-terrace. However, its first mention in The Argus in 1881 advertises it as a row of four houses, each with seven rooms.2 Tenders were called for its construction in 1884 by architects W H Elleker.3 The houses were originally numbered 15-27 High Street.4

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  1. Stonnington Planning Scheme 04HO
  2. The Argus. Friday 28 October 1881. Advertising, pg. 12
  3. The Argus. Thursday 7 August 1884. Advertising, pg. 3
  4. The Argus. Friday 20 March 1885. pg. 7

Wellington Terrace: 9-15 Wellington Street. Launceston, Tasmania

Launceston is blessed with a wide variety of terrace styles. Wellington Terrace, a row of five homes exhibits a particularly rare variation with its prominent double storey loggia, a terrace style more common in places such as Drummond Street Carlton or East Melbourne. Architecturally it makes a striking statement with minimal ornament, apart from its rythmic row of arches, Italianate balustrade, pilasters and cornice treatment. The loggia and verandah dating to 1911 is likely an addition to the front of an earlier Victorian era terrace given that other architectural features including windows, doors and their mouldings appear to date to the late 1870s to mid 1880s. Another striking feature is its central narrow arched carriageway topped by its pediment name plate which bears its name ‘Wellington Terrace’.

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Recent Discussion
  • admin: Na, this terrace is typical of the Italianate revival style common to the Richmond area and also much of...
  • Na: Is there any reason for the twin facades? Why twins? Why not triplets? It seems to repeat in other parts of...
  • Hilary Neylon: Hello Was very interested in reading about your story on 13-17 Franklin Street Maddingley (Bacchus...
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