23-25 Webster Street, Ballarat. Victoria (replicas)

Such is the effort that has gone into this replica that I almost did not recognise it as being one. This is one of the best efforts I found, so thought it worth mentioning. Presumably built around the 1990s next to an outstandingly large and tall terrace row, no expense has been spared in creating the illusion of a pair of Victorian terraces. If not for a few giveways such as use of clean modern bricks, a lack of render on the party walls, pastiche lacework, fence, garden and lighting and overall new look the average punter would unlikely know any different.

23-25 webster street ballarat victoria

Replica Terrace Houses: 23-25 Webster Street, Ballarat. Victoria

The terrace takes many of its design keys from local Ballarat terraces built in the late 1880s and early 1890s. The lower facade bears a strong resemblance to Ballarat Terrace with its heavy polychrmatic detail and the verandah decoration takes cues from Lascelles Terrace but has the uniform hipped roof profile of the shorter terraces of nearby Loch Street. The roof is large and corrugated, possibly using contemporary zinc alloy. Wooden eaves brackets are used for additional detail. The party walls project probably a little too harshly, obscuring the verandah roof and are plain brick with stepped profiles to indicate the floors.

The polychromatic brickwork on the facade of this terrace is simply stunning and highly detailed, perhaps to distract attention from the less authentic aspects. The upper storey has three windows each with lighter bricks emulating quoins. The lower storey has a large Palladian window composition surrounded by a flat arched polychrome bricks complete with darker bricks resembling a keystone. It is the doorway, however that makes a massive impact with its large arched opening and wooden windows surrounds complete with glass panels and Victorian replica door.

While less effort has gone into the verandah, it does have subtle features that definitely trick the eye. The verandah is dressed in replica iron lacework, most probably in aluminium, with fringe and brackets around a plain square wooden post all of which are in heritage colours. The post frames the doorway with good proportions. However the composition makes the upper storey look particularly squat which gives the impression of a lower modern ceiling height inside. The balustrade is separate panels spaced with vertical struts, a pattern which is similar to but still different from many other terraces. An elegant plain horizontal patterned wooden frieze which adds significant sophistication and detail to the design probably does more than any other feature to distract and fool the viewer.

Presumably the interiors are contemporary fittings to meet the latest building regulations. Though it will certainly be interesting to see this row in a hundred years time to compare its aging process to those that inspired it and other houses from this recent decade.

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  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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