Demolished

22-26 Lilydale Grove, Hawthorn East. Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2011)

Formerly a row of four, the remaining three of this row of single storey Queen Anne terraced cottages tells the sad tale of heritage in Melbourne’s Hawthorn which is being assailed by development from all directions.  Just a stones throw from the magnificent Auburn Road precinct reknowned for its late Victorian streetscapes, this row however has no heritage protection and it shows.  One of the end terraces (28) has already been demolished to become a rear access driveway for a showroom/factory complete with a lovely barb wire fence.  The row is unfortunately heavily obscured by evergreen shrubs.  The terrace pictured (number 26) which although unoccupied and derelect is in the most original condition, but currently advertised for sale as a development site.

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Rockdale: 96 Punt Road, Windsor. Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2015)

Rockdale is an attractive freestanding double storey former middle class home in the Italianate terrace style.  Like many of the grand homes along this stretch of Punt Road close to St Kilda Junction it is set back from the street.  Despite its obvious grandeur, Rockdale is unfortunately not afforded any heritage protection under the City of Stonnington planning scheme.

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3-9 Crown Street Woolloomooloo. Sydney, New South Wales (demolished 1980s)

This row of very tall triple storey terraces was a sad loss to Sydney, though fortunately others like it still do remain in the inner suburbs. (Image courtesy of City of Sydney Archives, CRS 000275)

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Granite Terrace: 1-9 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy. Melbourne, Victoria. (demolished 1965)

Granite Terrace (pictured here in 1958 a hundred years after its construction in 1858) is one of those buildings for which I wish I had a time machine to plead with developers not to demolish.  Armed with the knowledge of what was there before it is a painful experience to see what is there today.  Granite Terrace, a three storey Regency style terrace flanked another famous Melbourne terrace completed the same year – Royal Terrace. The facade of Granite Terrace was, as the name suggests, made of load bearing granite, in fact a light variety of the stone, however side walls were of bluestone.  The terrace had quite an interesting history.  It was built by Henry Miller, M.L.C. known as  “Money Miller” and the stone was quarried from his quarries at Mill Park near Morang1 and the architects were Robertson & Hale2.

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  1. “Victorian Building Stones”.  Secretary of the mines department, 1949
  2. South Fitzroy Study 1979. pg 15

Rochester Terrace 320-334 Jones Street, Ultimo. Sydney, New South Wales (demolished 1919)

Known as Rochester Terrace, this row of eight terrace houses built in 1879 and fronting Jones Street was typical of the rows of working class terraces homes built in Ultimo during late 1800s.  Erected before new building codes were introduced, it’s long gable corrugated iron roof is notably without projecting party walls and only changes pitch slightly on the verandah balconies.  Built in brick on a sandstone base it featured plain chimneys and party walls, iron lacework fringe, brackets and balcony and a wooden picket fence. (City of Sydney Archives, CRS 51/752)

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Bridget Goggs Terrace: Brisbane Street, Ipswich. Queensland (demolished 1936)

Built in 1858 by Matthew Goggs, this row of five single storey brick terraces with attic level is one of the few built in a Queensland provincial city.  The photo was taken just prior to its demolition in 1936, however even then the row was showing its age.  In the 1860s Ipswich, a booming mining town, rivaled penal Brisbane in terms of importance and many grand homes and terraces anticipated its further growth.  However history shows that Brisbane became the colony’s capital, quickly outgrew and absorbed Ipswich in its rapidly expanding western suburbs.

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Byrne Terrace: Wickham Terrace, Brisbane (demolished)

Byrne Terrace was a row of five double storey terraces on Wickham Terrace in Brisbane. It was completed in 1886 by developer George Byrne, just before the subdivision act which effectively stopped further terrace development, this row of houses overlooked the growing city and its river.  Byrne terrace was built for the wealthy and was occupied by businessmen, doctors and medical professionals some of who used the houses as consulting rooms.

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Recent Discussion
  • ANNETTE: My family lived in 102 Victoria St for many years. I was born into this home and it housed my family of 7....
  • admin: Many thanks for pointing out the error Ian ! Should be fixed now.
  • Gutter Cleaning: I actually cleaned the gutters on that old building once. Shame to see such an beautiful building...
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