1 storey

22-26 Lilydale Grove, Hawthorn East. Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2011)

Formerly a row of four, the remaining three of this row of single storey Queen Anne terraced cottages tells the sad tale of heritage in Melbourne’s Hawthorn which is being assailed by development from all directions.  Just a stones throw from the magnificent Auburn Road precinct reknowned for its late Victorian streetscapes, this row however has no heritage protection and it shows.  One of the end terraces (28) has already been demolished to become a rear access driveway for a showroom/factory complete with a lovely barb wire fence.  The row is unfortunately heavily obscured by evergreen shrubs.  The terrace pictured (number 26) which although unoccupied and derelect is in the most original condition, but currently advertised for sale as a development site.

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13-15 James Street. Port Fairy, Victoria

Port Fairy, known as Belfast (after the Irish city) during the early Victorian era was one of the colony’s early thriving coastal settlements and was much the same size as it is today.  So it is not really suprising to find quite a number of  semi-detached and terraced “cottages” about the town.  Unlike other Victorian cities, however due to the 1850s origins, the majority of Port Fairy’s cottages are mostly a very subdued Georgian style of double fronted home  (influenced by Irish architecture) similar to those found in southern Tasmania.  That makes this pair all the more interesting as it is probably more akin to the South Australian colonial terrace with its simple wooden verandah decorations.

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333-337 Lydiard Street North, Soldiers Hill. Ballarat, Victoria

This row of three single storey double fronted red brick Victorian era terraces mid way along the block is probably most notable for sporting a rare piece of Australiana – a kookaburra motif in its iron lacework.  According to expert on cast iron lacework Graeme Robertson, just a couple examples of this pattern in use exist, and one of them, at 16 Chatsworth Road, Prahran was demolished a couple of decades ago.  The terraces were built in 1888 as homes for Ballarat’s middle class.  This may be the only row of terraces existing in Australia with this pattern.

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77-79 Templeton Street. Castlemaine, Victoria

Of the few examples of terraced housing in the gold rush town of Castlemaine, this is possibly the most distinctly Australian of them with its iron lacework and verandah form. During the gold rush the population of Mount Alexander (as it was then known) was greater than Melbourne.  Confidence that it would continue to grow ensured that a smatterings of terraces emerged in the inner city streets during the 1860s and 1870s, however after the gold dried up more quickly than expected, the form of housing became an oddity in what was a provincial city.

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Ray Villa and Harris Villa: 45-47 Waterloo Crescent, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This exuberant semi-detached pair of Victorian Italianate villas, set back from the street, is one of two such pairs in close proximity (the other I will post at a future date).  Disappointingly while other nearby properties do, neither of these pairs has any heritage status under the City of Port Phillip planning scheme. There are several features of this terrace which are architecturally interesting, apart from the general mannerist baroque composition of the parapet, it is rare to see the diagonal criss-cross lattice where you’d normally expect a classical balustrade on an Australian terrace.  

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15-17 Franklin Street, Maddingley. Bacchus Marsh, Victoria.

Not something that you’d expect in Bacchus Marsh, much less one of its suburbs, this is a very rare row of double fronted single storey terraced homes. Described by the Moorabool council as “brick cottages” it is one of the only heritage protected structures in Maddingley and has its very own heritage overlay HO15.

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102-106 Victoria Street, Footscray. Melbourne, Victoria

This row of three narrow single storey terraces has been in the news lately as it has narrowly escaped compulsory acquisition and demolition1 that is set to clear land for a new railway line as part of the Victorian Regional Rail Link while the same cannot be said for the row of three 1990s postmodern terrace houses at 96-100 on the adjacent site.

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  1. Ted Baillieu slams government for treatment of ‘marooned’ families NORRIE ROSS, MATT SCHULZ HERALD SUN JULY 19, 2010 http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/fast-track-to-misery/story-e6frf7kx-1225893665022
Recent Discussion
  • admin: I think what this shows PeteS is 343 with its pre-modified facade (complete with the tiny strip of balustrade...
  • Crystal: More info on Simon Harvey please Regards, Crystal
  • Nicole: Hi there Hoping you may have some further details about these terraces. I am moving into 184 soon and...
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