Posts Tagged ‘1870s’

Bowen Terrace: 3-25 Bathurst Road. Orange, New South Wales.

Bowen Terrace is one of the longest double storey rows you’ll find in Australia but what is unusual is its location, situated in a regional city.  Built in 1876 for Henry Thomas Bowen1 to the design of architect John Hale2, it is also a fine row of houses architecturally with its long uninterrupted hipped roofspan (except for its elegantly placed chimneys), central parapet and open grille cast iron columns.

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  1. Australian Heritage Database record 904
  2. Heritage Council NSW

248-252 Sloane Street. Goulburn, New South Wales

The first in our regional series on Goulburn in New South Wales, this impressive row of three impressive row of three consisting of two triple storey with attic and one single storey currently operates as the Alpine Heritage Motel. It was once a symmetrical arrangement of four terrace houses built in 1872 and modified in 1880. In 1893, the separate houses were conjoined to become a temperance hotel known as “Metropolitan Coffee Palace”1 and later “Stock’s Coffee Palace”.2 The terrace to the left was demolished at a later date and an attic level was added during conversion to accommodation in the 1990s.

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  1. Goulburn Herald.Friday 22 September 1893. pg2
  2. Alpine Heritage Hotel. About Us. Accessed 17/08/2014

Moran’s Terrace: 100-104 Mollison Street, Bendigo. Victoria

On the southern edge of Bendigo’s CBD is this gem row of three double storey houses built and named for Maurice Moran in 1873 (as inscribed on the tympanum of the parapet).  Moran was a well known and respected resident who started as a printing foreman for the Bendigo Advertiser, Bendigo City Councillor, real estate developer and agent before moving to Melbourne and later Sydney.1 The design of residential architect T.A Nicholls2 produced a simple but stunning classically inspired row, with the most interesting features being the extensive vermiculation single storey verandah.  Unfortunately it is difficult to photograph due to a mature evergreen situated right in front of the mid terrace.

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  1. The Argus. 4 October 1919, page 8
  2. Eaglehawk & Bendigo Heritage Study Significant Sites

Young Street Terraces: 36-42 Young Street. Sydney, New South Wales

Sydney’s central business district once contained a great many rows of substantial terraces, many of three or more stories.  Many of them were mixed use. Today the landscape is far different but fortunately this row, known simply as “Young Street Terraces” has survived being one of few reminders of the Victorian boom era in the heart of town.   The terrace has almost always been a government building, occupying the site of what was originally government house.  Perhaps this is the reason why it stands on land around it is now occupied by skyscrapers. In 1851, the site was subdivided and in 1874 Joseph Paul Walker erected the terraces as offices leasing them to government departments.1

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  1. Heritage NSW file 834054

27-33 Hawke Street. West Melbourne, Victoria

While architecturally simple and missing their iron lacework decorations, these four single storey row houses are of a style that is actually quite rare in Melbourne but proliferated in the 1870s in inner Sydney areas such as Glebe and Newtown where extensive rows can be found (example 31-42 Mitchell Street, Glebe). What is distinctive about this style is not the transverse gable configuration, but the combination of the blade party walls, central chimney, slate tile and banded paint (cream and maroon) concave corrugated iron verandahs referred to as Post-regency in Sydney. Constructed between 1870-1872, they were built for John Marley who lived at number 33 and remained their owner until the 1890s.1

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  1. City of Melbourne i-Heritage

Barwon Mill Cottages. 42-52 Lower Paper Mills Road, Fyansford. Geelong, Victoria

This row of six single storey double fronted workers cottages was built between 1878 and 1879 in local bluestone and designed by Joseph Watts as part of the historic Barwon Paper Mill Victorian era industrial complex and a rare example of British model company housing ensuring that it has the highest heritage protection being on the Victorian Heritage Register (H0743)1, National Trust Register2 and part of a City of Greater Geelong heritage overlay HO2083.

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  1. Victorian Heritage Database H0743
  2. National Trust file B3361
  3. City of Greater Geelong Planning Scheme 47ho

Lorne Terrace: 83-87 Mitchell Street, Glebe. Sydney, New South Wales

Lorne Terrace was built in 1875 by William Jarrett1.  Notable for the use of the post-Regency Georgian style, a style fairly common in Glebe for the Industrial Building Society2. Architecturally it features the distinctive simplistic gable roof form with plain window ledges with double hung six pane windows and a single storey verandah with a concave striped corrugated iron roof with a small step down every couple of houses with chimneys in between.  The individual houses are defined by their doorways and the rainwater downpipes which descend their facades. This row is part of the Glebe Estate, a precinct heritage registered for its extensive stands of Victorian terraces including post-Regency examples such as this.

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  1. pg 158. Glebe Project. Australian Government Publishing Service. Canberra, 1980
  2. ibid
Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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