Posts Tagged ‘1888’

Dorset Terrace: 136-144 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania

As far as terraces go, Launceston is definitely one of Australia’s most suprising cities.  Its inner streets could be straight out of inner Sydney or Melbourne, all in a city a tenth the size of Adelaide such was the popularity of this housing style during its boom period.  Despite all this, almost all prominent texts on the subject point to one example, Alpha Terrace (which will be posted in due course possibly due to its bizarre mix of Sydney and Melbourne idiosyncrasies), though in my personal opinion there are many more notable examples of the style, some on the same St John Street stretch, such as the spectacular heritage listed1 “Dorset Terrace”2 a row of five homes erected in 1888 and likely  named after Dorset county in south west England, possibly overlooked due to its self aggrandizing Melbourne style.

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  1. Launceston City Council Schedule 2 Heritage Listed properties
  2. National Trust of Australia (Tasmania) database

57-69 Spensely Street, Clifton Hill. Melbourne, Victoria

The Clifton Hill estate was developed in the 1870s and with its own railway station opening in 1888 quickly sprouted a number of boom terrace rows.  This row of seven (including corner shop) erected the same year in the Queen Anne style and is one of the most consistent and richly decorated in suburban Melbourne. They were developed by T Smith for Charles Abbott in 18881

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  1. Collingwood Heritage Study Review 1996

333-337 Lydiard Street North, Soldiers Hill. Ballarat, Victoria

This row of three single storey double fronted red brick Victorian era terraces mid way along the block is probably most notable for sporting a rare piece of Australiana – a kookaburra motif in its iron lacework.  According to expert on cast iron lacework Graeme Robertson, just a couple examples of this pattern in use exist, and one of them, at 16 Chatsworth Road, Prahran was demolished a couple of decades ago.  The terraces were built in 1888 as homes for Ballarat’s middle class.  This may be the only row of terraces existing in Australia with this pattern.

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Avonmore: 26-42 The Avenue, Randwick. Sydney, New South Wales

Avonmore Terrace is currently a boutique hotel located opposite Alison Park in Randwick.  Built in 1888 by John Walsh the triple storey row of nine terraces contains 23 rooms rich in interior detail.  Pictured above is the middle terrace which is its most interesting feature.

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Hughgendon Terrace: 49-59 Gower Street, Kensington. Melbourne, Victoria

Hughendon Terrace is a long row of eight double storey boom style terrace houses in Kensington.   The elegant white terraces on flat ground form a classically inspired regency style row.   The parapet is plain with the exception of a prominent cornice punctuated only by pronounced arched pediments with crested mouldings.  Each pair of terraces shares a large roof and the pediment is designed to hide the gable behind as well as giving the appearance of wider individual houses.  The name of the terrace is curved inside the first two pediments of the row, one with signage of “Hughendon” and the other “Terrace”.

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Cook Terrace: 249 Coronation Drive, Milton. Brisbane, Queensland

Cook Terrace is a landmark along the Brisbane River at Coronation Drive.  It is a three storey row of six Victorian buildings dating back to 1888-1889. Currently used as offices as part of a prominent business park, this terrace has had a long and interesting history.

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Nathan’s Terrace: 1-11 Shields Street, Flemington. Melbourne, Victoria

Nathan’s Terrace is one of the most interesting single storey terraces you’ll find anywhere in Australia.  Nearly identical neo-baroque boom style villas front both Shields and Wellington Street in Flemington.  The mid terrace is crowned by lions and a coat of arms atop an exageratted pediment and squat corinthian columns flanked by prominent balustrades, urns and corbels verandahs with cast iron filligree and fences.  A bay of flanking villas are topped by a giant broken crown round pediments in a Palladian motif with round arch openings and double arched windows with a small awning form a temple style in an elaborate display of exaggerated Victorian Mannerism.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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