Posts Tagged ‘bendigo’

57-61 Eaglehawk Road, Ironbark. Bendigo, Victoria

As a lover of both the gold rush city of Bendigo and the variety of terraced housing to be found there it is suprising to find that while heritage overlays exist across most of Bendigo, this single storey row of three homes simply named “Terraces” in suburban Ironbark is afforded no heritage protection.  This is despite an Ironbark heritage study being published as recently as 2010.1

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  1. Ironbark Heritage Study 2010

Moran’s Terrace: 100-104 Mollison Street, Bendigo. Victoria

On the southern edge of Bendigo’s CBD is this gem row of three double storey houses built and named for Maurice Moran in 1873 (as inscribed on the tympanum of the parapet).  Moran was a well known and respected resident who started as a printing foreman for the Bendigo Advertiser, Bendigo City Councillor, real estate developer and agent before moving to Melbourne and later Sydney.1 The design of residential architect T.A Nicholls2 produced a simple but stunning classically inspired row, with the most interesting features being the extensive vermiculation single storey verandah.  Unfortunately it is difficult to photograph due to a mature evergreen situated right in front of the mid terrace.

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  1. The Argus. 4 October 1919, page 8
  2. Eaglehawk & Bendigo Heritage Study Significant Sites

Specimen Cottage: 178-180 Hargreaves Street. Bendigo, Victoria

Specimen Cottage, the oldest terrace house in Bendigo is also reputed to be the oldest house and possibly oldest buildings in the city.  The row of two sandstone ashlar cottages was built in two stages.  The first single storey double fronted cottage was erected in 1856 by local stonemason James Brierley.  The name and date are enscribed in stone above the doorway.  In 1861 he extended it with a matching double storey cottage.

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10 Garsed Street. Bendigo, Victoria

I discovered this delightful semi-detached pair of late Victorian terraces while wandering from the train station to Bendigo’s central business district.  The first suprise of my investigation of this great little pair of rare picturesque Queen Anne/Rustic Gothic terraces was its unrestored condition, the second was its lack of any heritage status in an area which is being rapidly redeveloped.  The two are currently on one title and adaptively reused as offices.  An unfortunately placed tree makes capturing the pair in one photo impossible.

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121-125 Wattle Street, Bendigo. Victoria

This pair of terrace houses, among the most impressive double fronted double storey renaissance revival terraces I have seen in Australia is currently recovering from severe 1960s bastardisation.  Until recently an unfortunate 60s reno had resulted in poorly maintained lacework was enclosed by wood, demolition of the third in the row to be replaced by a block of dog-box flats and the whole facade obscured by paperbark trees. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of these terraces is that they have full verandah facades on both sides with a rare long parallel double hipped roof.

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59-63 Mundy Street, Bendigo. Victoria

This row of three single storey houses caught my eye on the fringe of Bendigo’s CBD.   They are a simple red brick symmetrical row of Victorian era terraces in polychrome and unpainted render.  But what I found most interesting about them was the step profile of the parapet along the side of the end terrace facing Bramble Street which cascades like a waterfall.  The names of the terraces are in a recessed cartouche on each house : “Glentrool” (59), “Garlies” (61) and “Galloway” (63) and apparently named after forests in Scotland.

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Fernville Terrace: 35-41 Mackenzie Street, Bendigo. Victoria

Fernville Terrace is a relatively large row of terraces for a regional Australian city and is a striking sight in the precinct around the Sacret Heart Cathedral.  The design is particularly interesting.  Set on a hill, the double storey terrace follows the downward slope, with the bottom storey appearing sunken from street level.  In fact the entrances to the terraces are on the second storey, accessed by stairways which form a key part of the architectural expression.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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