Posts Tagged ‘boom style’

57 Morrah Street, Parkville. Melbourne, Victoria

Houses like this freestanding boom terrace style home are my personal favourites and Parkville is a place which abounds in such examples of high Victoriana. Unrendered and painted in mustard to simulate sandstone, this particular home was built in 1882 1 and retains many of its original features.  Though it appears to currently be undergoing renovations, hopefully much of its character can be preserved.

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  1. City of Melbourne i-Heritage database

328-344 Kings Way. South Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2012)

One of the few remaining on Kings Way, this grand terrace was built by Robert Howard in 1890.1 While the landmark triple “boom style” storey terrace is within its own heritage overlay HO1772, sadly in 2012 the council allowed demolition of all but the facade, along with reconstruction of a noticeably inaccurately reproduction roof and dormers to incorporate the facade into the “Silverleaf” 14 storey apartment tower development which now wraps around and completely overwhelms it. The Decorative  festoons and cornice of the original have been removed in the process, contributing to its current pastiche appearance.

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  1. Port Phillip Planning Report. Statutory Planning Committee 19th October 2010
  2. Port Phillip Planning Scheme Heritage Overlay

34 Park Place, South Yarra. Melbourne, Victoria

This freestanding boom style terrace in great condition was originally built in 1891 by Alfred Taylor and is part of a subdivision with direct frontage to beautiful Fawkner Park.

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Shoreham: 9 Chetwynd Street, North Melbourne. Victoria

Shoreham is a grand freestanding terrace style house with boom style characterstics although it was built some time after the boom in 1898 and classified as Edwardian.

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Lynton and Torquay: 13-15 Simpson Street. East Melbourne, Victoria

This pair of beautifully preserved row of two double storey boom style Victorian terrace houses, while of similar form to many others of its period and in the classical style has some interesting features which set them apart, demonstrating a clearly free-classical spirit. The pair of villas has their names “Lynton” (13) and “Torquay” (15) on the parapets of each. 

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Pulteney House and St Frances House: 45-47 Carlisle Street, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

Despite the efforts of multi-storey flats in recent years, the 1880s boom style terraces of Puteney House and St Frances House still dominate the streetscape between the Barkly Street and St Kilda Road junctions of Carlisle Street. The pair of white double storey “Melbourne style” or “Boom style” terraces form a small row with prominent classical parapets.

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Recent Discussion
  • Bryan Stralow: As a restoration company working throughout VIC, we see all types of construction issues and...
  • Faith Griffiths: The property 4 Collett St Kensington was in 1931 Gipps Ward Melbourne Hospital. (information copied...
  • Georgia: Does anyone know who currently owns these terraces? They are very iconic on Ormond St and seem to be full of...
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