Posts Tagged ‘Demolished’

Rockdale: 96 Punt Road, Windsor. Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2015)

Rockdale is an attractive freestanding double storey former middle class home in the Italianate terrace style.  Like many of the grand homes along this stretch of Punt Road close to St Kilda Junction it is set back from the street.  Despite its obvious grandeur, Rockdale is unfortunately not afforded any heritage protection under the City of Stonnington planning scheme.

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328-344 Kings Way. South Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2012)

One of the few remaining on Kings Way, this grand terrace was built by Robert Howard in 1890.1 While the landmark triple “boom style” storey terrace is within its own heritage overlay HO1772, sadly in 2012 the council allowed demolition of all but the facade, along with reconstruction of a noticeably inaccurately reproduction roof and dormers to incorporate the facade into the “Silverleaf” 14 storey apartment tower development which now wraps around and completely overwhelms it. The Decorative  festoons and cornice of the original have been removed in the process, contributing to its current pastiche appearance.

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  1. Port Phillip Planning Report. Statutory Planning Committee 19th October 2010
  2. Port Phillip Planning Scheme Heritage Overlay

3-9 Crown Street Woolloomooloo. Sydney, New South Wales (demolished 1980s)

This row of very tall triple storey terraces was a sad loss to Sydney, though fortunately others like it still do remain in the inner suburbs. (Image courtesy of City of Sydney Archives, CRS 000275)

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Granite Terrace: 1-9 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy. Melbourne, Victoria. (demolished 1965)

Granite Terrace (pictured here in 1958 a hundred years after its construction in 1858) is one of those buildings for which I wish I had a time machine to plead with developers not to demolish.  Armed with the knowledge of what was there before it is a painful experience to see what is there today.  Granite Terrace, a three storey Regency style terrace flanked another famous Melbourne terrace completed the same year – Royal Terrace. The facade of Granite Terrace was, as the name suggests, made of load bearing granite, in fact a light variety of the stone, however side walls were of bluestone.  The terrace had quite an interesting history.  It was built by Henry Miller, M.L.C. known as  “Money Miller” and the stone was quarried from his quarries at Mill Park near Morang1 and the architects were Robertson & Hale2.

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  1. “Victorian Building Stones”.  Secretary of the mines department, 1949
  2. South Fitzroy Study 1979. pg 15

Rochester Terrace 320-334 Jones Street, Ultimo. Sydney, New South Wales (demolished 1919)

Known as Rochester Terrace, this row of eight terrace houses built in 1879 and fronting Jones Street was typical of the rows of working class terraces homes built in Ultimo during late 1800s.  Erected before new building codes were introduced, it’s long gable corrugated iron roof is notably without projecting party walls and only changes pitch slightly on the verandah balconies.  Built in brick on a sandstone base it featured plain chimneys and party walls, iron lacework fringe, brackets and balcony and a wooden picket fence. (City of Sydney Archives, CRS 51/752)

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13-14 Grattan Street, Prahran. Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2010)

At the time I took this photo of this pair of terraces in Prahran, a big display sign had just gone up for new apartments called “Nero Apartments”.  There were mattresses out the front and the obviously evicted tenants were moving their stuff out of the place.  Presumably this pair of single storey villas were to make way for another apartment box like the ones next door. It was sad to think of the Grattan Reserve being without these uniquely Melbourne polychromatic boom style terraces. 

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301-303 Beaconsfield Parade, St Kilda West. Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2012)

This picture shows 301-303 Beaconsfield Parade, a dainty single storey row of three Edwardian terraces. At the time it was pictured is a real estate sign declaring “no heritage overlay”, situated in an area under the relentless pressure of bayside development. Edwardian terrace rows (longer than a semi detached pair) are quite rare in this part of Melbourne and in Melbourne as a whole. The row was partially demolished in 2012 after the sale of 301 severely compromising the architectural integrity of the row.

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Recent Discussion
  • Bryan Stralow: As a restoration company working throughout VIC, we see all types of construction issues and...
  • Faith Griffiths: The property 4 Collett St Kensington was in 1931 Gipps Ward Melbourne Hospital. (information copied...
  • Georgia: Does anyone know who currently owns these terraces? They are very iconic on Ormond St and seem to be full of...
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