Posts Tagged ‘dormer windows’

46-52 Victoria Street, Potts Point. Sydney, New South Wales

Situated on Victoria Street between Challis and McDonald Street is this imposing triple storey terrace row with attics of has spectacular views westward across Woolloomooloo Bay toward the Sydney CBD, though it is difficult to photograph due to towering London plane trees in front.

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Princess Row: 190-198 Petrie Terrace. Brisbane, Queensland

Located on the corner of Princess Street and Petrie Terrace, this row of four attached workers cottages on the fringe of the central business district was built in an era when Brisbane was still without public transport. Forming part of the historic Petrie Terrace group of terraces and cottages, its prominently steep gable roof is free of projecting party walls and each cottage is marked only by paired dormer windows and shared chimneys between each pair. This is probably the most rustic of the remaining working cottages with its corrugated iron roof clearly corroding. The addition of an interwar shopfront on the corner obscures one of the end terraces.

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52-60 Argyle Place, Millers Point. Sydney, New South Wales

Although it has the outward appearance of the 1880s, this row of five Victorian era terraces is one of Sydney’s earliest, dating as far back as 1842. They were recently sold by NSW public housing for a handsome sum of money to private owners. The terraces were built by whaler Charles Grimes in the early 1840s and were depicted in artist Conrad Marten’s work in 1843. The row was completed sometime around 1848 and were originally modest shingle roofed cottages with single storey verandahs and originally had uninterrupted harbour views.1

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115-121 Kent Street, Millers Point. Sydney, New South Wales

This flatly laid out Italianate row of four double storey terraced houses could almost be mistaken for a typical Melbourne terrace if not for the discrete attic dormer profiles projecting above the parapet. One interesting aspect of the layout is the end terrace at 115 has a noticeably narrower profile and very subtle and skilled modifications have been made to the design to adjust.

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328-344 Kings Way. South Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2012)

One of the few remaining on Kings Way, this grand terrace was built by Robert Howard in 1890.1 While the landmark triple “boom style” storey terrace is within its own heritage overlay HO1772, sadly in 2012 the council allowed demolition of all but the facade, along with reconstruction of a noticeably inaccurately reproduction roof and dormers to incorporate the facade into the “Silverleaf” 14 storey apartment tower development which now wraps around and completely overwhelms it. The Decorative  festoons and cornice of the original have been removed in the process, contributing to its current pastiche appearance.

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  1. Port Phillip Planning Report. Statutory Planning Committee 19th October 2010
  2. Port Phillip Planning Scheme Heritage Overlay

12-18 Fitzroy Street, Surry Hills. Sydney, New South Wales

Shown here are some Surry Hills working class terraces which are build right up to the property line and march up a subtly sloping inner city street. Their facades are bare with the exception of the ledges with their little brackets and the mouldings designed to throw rain off the double hung windows and the unsympathetically harsh but necessary security grilles on the doors and windows.

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2-10 Rockwall Crescent, Potts Point. Sydney, New South Wales

This row of four terrace houses, hidden in a Potts Point sidestreet would have to be one of the most interesting in Sydney. Standing at 3 storeys with an additional attic level and English style basement, they create, along with their neighbouring rows, a truly impressive Victorian streetscape that would certainly not look out of place in inner London. There are a few key things that set this terrace apart – the prominence given to the roofs; the Italianate style of the faceted bay which rises through the centre of the facade of each house; and the skillful reservation in which ornament is used. All these things give symmetry, lend the row a sense of grandeur and elegance as well as donate significant rhythm to the street.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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