Posts Tagged ‘double storey’

St Aubyn’s Terrace. 255-265 High Street. Penrith, New South Wales

St Aubyn’s is a row of six south facing double storey terrace homes erected in 1886 opposite St Stephen’s. Terraces today are a rare sight in Penrith, although others built during the period, such as a similar row of three Carlton Terrace and terraces along nearby rows in Henry Street were later demolished. An interesting feature of the central parapet is the initials ‘JB’, apparently of the builder John Brown.1 Though constructed of brick, with the rendered mustard colour of the parapet, the terraces have a solid appearance mimicking the local sandstone buildings of an earlier period.
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  1. City of Penrith archive item 003115

Stirling Terrace: 114-118 Dryburgh Street. North Melbourne, Victoria

Stirling Terrace is a row of three double storey classical filigree terraces dating to around 1887.1  Its most striking feature is the central pediment with its relief, dentils and acroteria.

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  1. The Age. pg. 3. For Rent section. 28 June 1887

267-269 Browning Street. Bathurst, New South Wales

Bathurst is one of those rare Australian cities where you’ll find terrace houses on almost every street near the centre of town. Its also a place where you’ll find out of the way terraces like this pair located opposite the historic Bathurst Gaol complex some 3 kilometres from the city centre. While there is much information on the history of the prison complex constructed between 1886-1888 to the plans of architect James Barnet, little is to be found on this Queen Anne styled double storey pair with its prominent gables was presumably built later, possibly in the 1890s. It is likely that these houses provided accommodation to workers at the gaol complex.1

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  1. pg 17. Bathurst Conservation Area Review. B. J. Hickson Architect and Heritage Adviser in association page with Bathurst Regional Council. September 2007

Bowen Terrace: 3-25 Bathurst Road. Orange, New South Wales.

Bowen Terrace is one of the longest double storey rows you’ll find in Australia but what is unusual is its location, situated in a regional city.  Built in 1876 for Henry Thomas Bowen1 to the design of architect John Hale2, it is also a fine row of houses architecturally with its long uninterrupted hipped roofspan (except for its elegantly placed chimneys), central parapet and open grille cast iron columns.

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  1. Australian Heritage Database record 904
  2. Heritage Council NSW

Archbishop’s Row: 18-32 Catherine Street, Subiaco. Perth, Western Australia

Subiaco is probably best known for its cricket and Australian rules stadium, though just around the corner are some excellent examples of terraced housing. Built in 1904, this row of eight Italianate style terrace homes presents as two rows of four homes and is significant on a number of accounts.  Firstly it is a rare architectural bearer of the emblem of the black swan, a symbol of Western

Australia (formerly the Swan River colony) which appears on the two centre pediments of each row. It is not known where the name originated.1 The row also features a rare cast iron balustrade panel and is a late follower of a style made popular in the eastern states during the Victorian era.

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  1.  City of Subiaco walking tours

248-252 Sloane Street. Goulburn, New South Wales

The first in our regional series on Goulburn in New South Wales, this impressive row of three impressive row of three consisting of two triple storey with attic and one single storey currently operates as the Alpine Heritage Motel. It was once a symmetrical arrangement of four terrace houses built in 1872 and modified in 1880. In 1893, the separate houses were conjoined to become a temperance hotel known as “Metropolitan Coffee Palace”1 and later “Stock’s Coffee Palace”.2 The terrace to the left was demolished at a later date and an attic level was added during conversion to accommodation in the 1990s.

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  1. Goulburn Herald.Friday 22 September 1893. pg2
  2. Alpine Heritage Hotel. About Us. Accessed 17/08/2014

57-71 Napier Street, Essendon. Melbourne, Victoria

This impressive row of eight double storey boom style polychrome terraces, captured by Alastair Lamont, is situated close to the “Windy Hill” Essendon football ground (home of AFL’s Essendon Bombers). Suprisingly for such a rare substantial suburban row, these homes are not even afforded local heritage protection under the Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme.1  Though they appear to be generally well looked after and highly sought after.

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  1. Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme
Recent Discussion
  • admin: I think what this shows PeteS is 343 with its pre-modified facade (complete with the tiny strip of balustrade...
  • Crystal: More info on Simon Harvey please Regards, Crystal
  • Nicole: Hi there Hoping you may have some further details about these terraces. I am moving into 184 soon and...
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