Posts Tagged ‘festoons’

77-79 Grey Street, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This architecturally fascinating eclectic double storey terraced pair located on once fashionable but now seedy St Kilda Hill features aspects of both Federation and Queen Anne styles merged with the terrace house idiom with its distinctive “blood and bandage” red brick and cream render. A picturesque effect is achieved through the central gable parapet along with the steeply pitched slate roof high chimneys with their terracotta pots. Dating to 1892, the residences were built for Gavan Shaw, a wine merchant who owned and lived in a neighbouring mansion. For many years, however, it operated as a backpacker hostel known as “St Kilda Lodge”.

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Ray Villa and Harris Villa: 45-47 Waterloo Crescent, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This exuberant semi-detached pair of Victorian Italianate villas, set back from the street, is one of two such pairs in close proximity (the other I will post at a future date).  Disappointingly while other nearby properties do, neither of these pairs has any heritage status under the City of Port Phillip planning scheme. There are several features of this terrace which are architecturally interesting, apart from the general mannerist baroque composition of the parapet, it is rare to see the diagonal criss-cross lattice where you’d normally expect a classical balustrade on an Australian terrace.  

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102-106 Victoria Street, Footscray. Melbourne, Victoria

This row of three narrow single storey terraces has been in the news lately as it has narrowly escaped compulsory acquisition and demolition1 that is set to clear land for a new railway line as part of the Victorian Regional Rail Link while the same cannot be said for the row of three 1990s postmodern terrace houses at 96-100 on the adjacent site.

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  1. Ted Baillieu slams government for treatment of ‘marooned’ families NORRIE ROSS, MATT SCHULZ HERALD SUN JULY 19, 2010 http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/fast-track-to-misery/story-e6frf7kx-1225893665022

328-344 Kings Way. South Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2012)

One of the few remaining on Kings Way, this grand terrace was built by Robert Howard in 1890.1 While the landmark triple “boom style” storey terrace is within its own heritage overlay HO1772, sadly in 2012 the council allowed demolition of all but the facade, along with reconstruction of a noticeably inaccurately reproduction roof and dormers to incorporate the facade into the “Silverleaf” 14 storey apartment tower development which now wraps around and completely overwhelms it. The Decorative  festoons and cornice of the original have been removed in the process, contributing to its current pastiche appearance.

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  1. Port Phillip Planning Report. Statutory Planning Committee 19th October 2010
  2. Port Phillip Planning Scheme Heritage Overlay

Hillside: 155-159 Hoddle Street, Richmond. Melbourne, Victoria

Hillside is a terrace I’ve been fascinated with for many years.  Occupying a commanding position setback high atop Richmond Hill on busy Hoddle Street, this tall double storey row of three Italianate terrace houses has been without its double storey verandah for so long I wonder if anyone remembers what the original looked like.  Nevertheless, its architecture reveals many interesting and typically Melbourne features.

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7 McCully Street, Ascot Vale. Melbourne, Victoria

This freestanding boom style double storey terrace is unfortunately not heritage protected and is in an unrenovated state.  Its double storey verandah balustrade, iron lacework and roof has been removed with a single column and decking all that remains and there are large visible cracks on the facade.  Still the facade is largely in its original condition and the lack of verandah reveals a  richly decorated parapet and party walls.

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Hollyford: 57 St Vincent Place Sth, Albert Park. Melbourne, Victoria

Hollyford is a spectacular double fronted Victorian villa in the terrace style found overlooking Albert Parks beautiful St Vincents Gardens.  Built in 1873 in polychrome brick and render, this single storey terraced house features incredible detail typically associated with the Melbourne “boom style”.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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