Posts Tagged ‘gable roof’

286-302 Jones Street, Pyrmont. Sydney, New South Wales

Set high in Pyrmont’s hills, this is one of two long and similarly designed but distinct rows of single storey cottages, like its neighbours, this row of nine is notable for its polychrome treatment and Queen Anne inspired gable design.  Built in the late 1890s, sometime after 1897, the homes first appear in council rate books around 1901.1  The entire row was owned by J E Kin and let at £35.2

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  1. City of Sydney Assessment books 1896-1901
  2. ibid

77-79 Templeton Street. Castlemaine, Victoria

Of the few examples of terraced housing in the gold rush town of Castlemaine, this is possibly the most distinctly Australian of them with its iron lacework and verandah form. During the gold rush the population of Mount Alexander (as it was then known) was greater than Melbourne.  Confidence that it would continue to grow ensured that a smatterings of terraces emerged in the inner city streets during the 1860s and 1870s, however after the gold dried up more quickly than expected, the form of housing became an oddity in what was a provincial city.

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29-33 Berry Street, Spring Hill. Brisbane, Queensland

I became aware of this small but tall row of unnamed terrace houses when Today Tonight did a story on them. Hidden in a small lane off Wickham Terrace, they are currently owned by Astor Hotel Apartments and hired out as budget accommodation. According to the segment, some guests were not happy with their apparent poor interior condition.

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10-18 Chalder Street, Newtown. Sydney, New South Wales

A row of four narrow double storey Victorian terraced houses in Newtown, an area full of similar streetscapes.These have a prominent central party wall along the steeply pitched corrugated iron roof with long chimneys on it and both end terraces. One of the terraces (16) gives an indication of the original corrugated iron alternating painted pattern which was common on verandahs of terraced buildings of the era.  The plainly dressed party walls project out to frame the verandah and divide the two main bays.  Cast iron lacework featuring fine fringes with brackets and balustrades are a feature of the facade.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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