Posts Tagged ‘grille columns’

165-171 Australia Street, Camperdown. Sydney, New South Wales

This row of eight double storey terrace houses has a former corner store on its end terrace situated on the corner of Lands Lane.  The row runs along Australia Street between Federation Lane and Lands Lane. The houses themselves are built up to the property line on the street with their double storey verandahs.  There are parapets on each house in the Melbourne style, however they stagger up the hills either singularly or in pairs in typical Sydney fashion.  The parapets hide the steeple of large gabled corrugated iron roofs with chimneys.  They have a central raised curve simulating a semi-circular pediment atop a set of string courses and a circle motif with a heavy cornice below.   The party walls are decorated with scrolls at the upper level and acanthus leaves and scrolls at the lower level.

More information »

7-9 Arundel Street, Glebe. Sydney, New South Wales

This set of interesting row of four double storey terrace houses is directly opposite the University of Sydney in Glebe. Arguably the most interesting aspect of this row is the end terrace.  While elaborate end terraces are typical of later terrace houses in Sydney areas particularly Glebe and Balmain, this one demonstrates a mix of styles.  The end terrace juts out with a large gable decorated with picturesque bargeboards and finial which break the rhythm of the row and it also also features a large italianate style two storey bay window including flat arched windows and keystones over a rusticated stone base. 

More information »

82-102 Victoria Street. Potts Point, New South Wales

Not sure if the terraces at 82-102 Victoria Street in Potts Point have a name but the row of 13 would almost certainly have to be the longest row of three storey terraces in Australia in one of the most beautiful and interesting streets you will find in this country.

More information »

Harris Terrace: 80 George Street. Brisbane, Queensland

Harris Terrace is one of Brisbane’s rare terraces.  Built in 1867 by local businessman George Harris who named the terraces for himself and designed by J & G Cowlishaw, Harris Terrace was aimed at providing accommodation for the Brisbane bourgeoisie.   It was renamed “Harris Court” following the common nomenclature for prestige flats in the 1920s, however the name and date on the central parapet plaque remains.

More information »

Recent Discussion
  • ANNETTE: My family lived in 102 Victoria St for many years. I was born into this home and it housed my family of 7....
  • admin: Many thanks for pointing out the error Ian ! Should be fixed now.
  • Gutter Cleaning: I actually cleaned the gutters on that old building once. Shame to see such an beautiful building...
Tags