Posts Tagged ‘italianate’

Voilet Terrace: 1-5 King Street, Randwick. Sydney, New South Wales

Violet terrace, completed in 1884 adjacent to Randwick Racecource is a row of three narrow double storey terraces in an Italianate style atypical of Sydney terraces.
The terrace is distinctive for its unrendered facade and restrained, but relatively intact ornament.
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Hazelwood Terrace: 46-48 Howe Crescent, South Melbourne. Melbourne, Victoria

Hazelwood Terrace is a row of three italianate styled, elaborately and ornate stucco terraces. Howe Crescent forms part of the St Vincent Gardens street plan. These terraces were designed prior to the iron lacework trend originally designed by Clement
Hodgkinson for George Black, but with modifications by esteemed architect Charles Webb who designed Melbourne’s famous “Grand” Victorian hotel (now the Windsor).1 With a solid looking brick rendered facade modelled on stone work, this terrace is unique for the treatment of its prominent ground level balcony and arcade of classically inspired doorways.

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  1. Heritage Victoria record H0222

Stawell and Princess: 33-35 Princess Street, Kew. Melbourne, Victoria

Terraces aren’t as common in Kew as other Melbourne suburbs, but there are still a few around. This pair was completed in 1892 for William Grace.1 Stawell, originally known as Biggin and Princess are architecturally, the pair is fairly typical of the style seen elsewhere in Melbourne, though fewer of this style were built elsewhere in the 1890s.

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  1. Boroondara Heritage Review B Graded Buildings. Lovel Chen 2005. pg. 287

Archbishop’s Row: 18-32 Catherine Street, Subiaco. Perth, Western Australia

Subiaco is probably best known for its cricket and Australian rules stadium, though just around the corner are some excellent examples of terraced housing. Built in 1904, this row of eight Italianate style terrace homes presents as two rows of four homes and is significant on a number of accounts.  Firstly it is a rare architectural bearer of the emblem of the black swan, a symbol of Western

Australia (formerly the Swan River colony) which appears on the two centre pediments of each row. It is not known where the name originated.1 The row also features a rare cast iron balustrade panel and is a late follower of a style made popular in the eastern states during the Victorian era.

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  1.  City of Subiaco walking tours

4-16 Burton Street, Glebe. Sydney, New South Wales

Glebe, like Paddington is one of those areas where you can almost get lost in the uniformity of the long stretches of double storey terraces.  Burton Street, set near the railway line, while not possessing many homes of great individual character is typically Sydney, but refreshingly different in its Victorian era charm with its narrow rising aspect and hodge podge of double and single storey terraces and styles.  The longest row in the street is this unnamed row of five, erected in 1881.

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Shakspeare Terrace: 329-343 Punt Road. Richmond, Victoria

Shakspeare Terrace (an obvious if curious mispelling of the famous Shakespeare) is a row of eight double storey Victorian Italianate terraces positioned as one of the most visible in Melbourne commanding a prime position between the Punt Road Oval (and iconic Melbourne Cricket Ground) and Richmond railway station, it is also one of the most sadly neglected terraces in Melbourne.

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Premier Terrace 2-12 Wentworth Park Road Glebe Sydney New South Wales

This row of six double storey Italianate terraces enscribed “Premier Terrace” (centre parapet), fronts Wentworth Park along the busy but tree lined Wentworth Road in Sydney’s Glebe between Mitchell Street and Park Lane and is serviced by Mitchell Lane.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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