Posts Tagged ‘lydiard street ballarat’

333-337 Lydiard Street North, Soldiers Hill. Ballarat, Victoria

This row of three single storey double fronted red brick Victorian era terraces mid way along the block is probably most notable for sporting a rare piece of Australiana – a kookaburra motif in its iron lacework.  According to expert on cast iron lacework Graeme Robertson, just a couple examples of this pattern in use exist, and one of them, at 16 Chatsworth Road, Prahran was demolished a couple of decades ago.  The terraces were built in 1888 as homes for Ballarat’s middle class.  This may be the only row of terraces existing in Australia with this pattern.

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Oberon: 215 Lydiard Street, Soldiers Hill. Ballarat, Victoria

Oberon is a freestanding single storey Italianate villa in the terrace house style. It is adaptively reused as offices. The house features what can best be described as a highly refined florid facade. In this design, the three most important elements – parapet, verandah and openings are given maximum emphasis in detail.

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Ballarat Terrace: 227-231 Lydiard Street North, Soldiers Hill. Ballarat, Victoria

Ballarat Terrace, built in 1889, is about as close to the Melbourne boom style of terrace that you can find outside of Melbourne. The terrace is fully restored and operates as a bed and breakfast. It was designed for publican Hugh Raverty by local architect firm James and Piper.1

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  1. Turner, Brian. The Australian Terrace House. pg 74

301-311 Lydiard Street Nth. Soldiers Hill. Ballarat, Victoria

This row of six single storey rendered brick Victorian era terraces is the longest of several single storey rows along Lydiard Street. The row marches down the hill and terminates in an end terrace shop on the Seymour Street corner.

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416-426 Lydiard Street North, Soldiers Hill. Ballarat, Victoria

This row of six single storey double fronted red brick Victorian era terraces is the longest of several single storey rows along Lydiard Street.  The row marches down the hill and terminates in an end terrace shop on the Macarthur Street corner.  The terraces themselves are wide with a central door and a prominently banded facade with double column support filligree verandahs and feature original cast iron fences.  The roof features decorated eaves and a visible low pitched profile with two banded chimneys.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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