Posts Tagged ‘melbourne’

Nepean Terrace: 128-132 Gipps Street, East Melbourne

Nepean Terrace is a significant early terrace in East Melbourne near the Fitzroy Gardens. Architecturally, it is from an era before iron lacework became popular. Instead the regency style inspired design features a single storey verandah of concave roof with an arcade of arches supported by paired wooden posts. The brackets feature elaborate carvings of floral patterns, as do the party walls and ledges with their finely moulded corbels.

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Hazelwood Terrace: 46-48 Howe Crescent, South Melbourne. Melbourne, Victoria

Hazelwood Terrace is a row of three italianate styled, elaborately and ornate stucco terraces. Howe Crescent forms part of the St Vincent Gardens street plan. These terraces were designed prior to the iron lacework trend originally designed by Clement
Hodgkinson for George Black, but with modifications by esteemed architect Charles Webb who designed Melbourne’s famous “Grand” Victorian hotel (now the Windsor).1 With a solid looking brick rendered facade modelled on stone work, this terrace is unique for the treatment of its prominent ground level balcony and arcade of classically inspired doorways.

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  1. Heritage Victoria record H0222

Stawell and Princess: 33-35 Princess Street, Kew. Melbourne, Victoria

Terraces aren’t as common in Kew as other Melbourne suburbs, but there are still a few around. This pair was completed in 1892 for William Grace.1 Stawell, originally known as Biggin and Princess are architecturally, the pair is fairly typical of the style seen elsewhere in Melbourne, though fewer of this style were built elsewhere in the 1890s.

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  1. Boroondara Heritage Review B Graded Buildings. Lovel Chen 2005. pg. 287

Stirling Terrace: 114-118 Dryburgh Street. North Melbourne, Victoria

Stirling Terrace is a row of three double storey classical filigree terraces dating to around 1887.1  Its most striking feature is the central pediment with its relief, dentils and acroteria.

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  1. The Age. pg. 3. For Rent section. 28 June 1887

57-71 Napier Street, Essendon. Melbourne, Victoria

This impressive row of eight double storey boom style polychrome terraces, captured by Alastair Lamont, is situated close to the “Windy Hill” Essendon football ground (home of AFL’s Essendon Bombers). Suprisingly for such a rare substantial suburban row, these homes are not even afforded local heritage protection under the Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme.1  Though they appear to be generally well looked after and highly sought after.

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  1. Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme

Wilson’s Terrace: 129-135 High Street, Prahran. Melbourne, Victoria

This row of four double storey Victorian filligree terraces has been adaptively used as professional suites. Given the lack of current heritage protection offered (as of 2014 it is not covered by a heritage overlay under the Stonnington planning Scheme1. Given the position of the signage on the segmental arch of the parapet which bears the name “Wilson’s Terrace”, one would think this terrace was originally a row of five with two houses on either side of the mid-terrace. However, its first mention in The Argus in 1881 advertises it as a row of four houses, each with seven rooms.2 Tenders were called for its construction in 1884 by architects W H Elleker.3 The houses were originally numbered 15-27 High Street.4

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  1. Stonnington Planning Scheme 04HO
  2. The Argus. Friday 28 October 1881. Advertising, pg. 12
  3. The Argus. Thursday 7 August 1884. Advertising, pg. 3
  4. The Argus. Friday 20 March 1885. pg. 7

45-53 Chaucer Street, Moonee Ponds. Melbourne, Victoria

We’re extremely lucky to have such an avid readership and one passionate reader Ian Macwhirter, responded to our call for contributions with a photo and well written piece about a beautiful boom style freestanding terraces of Chaucer Street in Moonee Pond and provided permission to publish them here. Ian writes:
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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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