Posts Tagged ‘millers point’

52-60 Argyle Place, Millers Point. Sydney, New South Wales

Although it has the outward appearance of the 1880s, this row of five Victorian era terraces is one of Sydney’s earliest, dating as far back as 1842. They were recently sold by NSW public housing for a handsome sum of money to private owners. The terraces were built by whaler Charles Grimes in the early 1840s and were depicted in artist Conrad Marten’s work in 1843. The row was completed sometime around 1848 and were originally modest shingle roofed cottages with single storey verandahs and originally had uninterrupted harbour views.1

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115-121 Kent Street, Millers Point. Sydney, New South Wales

This flatly laid out Italianate row of four double storey terraced houses could almost be mistaken for a typical Melbourne terrace if not for the discrete attic dormer profiles projecting above the parapet. One interesting aspect of the layout is the end terrace at 115 has a noticeably narrower profile and very subtle and skilled modifications have been made to the design to adjust.

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Alfred Terrace: 37-47 Kent Street, Millers Point. Sydney, New South Wales

Alfred Terrace (or Alfred’s Terrace) is a row of six double storey (with additional basement level) Georgian style sandstone block terraces forming part of a very intact early Victorian streetscape on Sydney’s Kent Street. Alfred’s Terrace was built between 1868 and 1870 for Sir George Wigram Allen prominent Sydney solicitor and politician.1

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  1. pg 178 CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES Housing NSW Properties Millers Point VOLUME TWO Final Draft October 2004

12-35 High Street, Millers Point. Sydney, New South Wales

Miller’s Point has a large number of terrace rows, however many differ from typical terraces in their Edwardian style and their unusual layout and arrangement.  There are at least six massive rows of such terraces near the harbour at High Street and Windmill Street along Walsh Bay and a redevelopment area which is now called Barangaroo.  At least four of these rows are nearly carbon copies.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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