Posts Tagged ‘new south wales’

Voilet Terrace: 1-5 King Street, Randwick. Sydney, New South Wales

Violet terrace, completed in 1884 adjacent to Randwick Racecource is a row of three narrow double storey terraces in an Italianate style atypical of Sydney terraces.
The terrace is distinctive for its unrendered facade and restrained, but relatively intact ornament.
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8-14 Lithgow Street. Lithgow, New South Wales

Lithgow is one of the few places in the Blue Mountains area where you can find terraced housing and many of the working class terraces there served as housing for the mining and industry in the 19th century. This row of four double storey terraces is situated in the Pottery Estate and likely dates to the 1880s, most probably serving as homes for those working at the local colliery which opened in 1873.1  Architecturally they are interesting for the materials and lack of significant ornament.

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  1.  NSW Heritage record 1960330

St Aubyn’s Terrace. 255-265 High Street. Penrith, New South Wales

St Aubyn’s is a row of six south facing double storey terrace homes erected in 1886 opposite St Stephen’s. Terraces today are a rare sight in Penrith, although others built during the period, such as a similar row of three Carlton Terrace and terraces along nearby rows in Henry Street were later demolished. An interesting feature of the central parapet is the initials ‘JB’, apparently of the builder John Brown.1 Though constructed of brick, with the rendered mustard colour of the parapet, the terraces have a solid appearance mimicking the local sandstone buildings of an earlier period.
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  1. City of Penrith archive item 003115

267-269 Browning Street. Bathurst, New South Wales

Bathurst is one of those rare Australian cities where you’ll find terrace houses on almost every street near the centre of town. Its also a place where you’ll find out of the way terraces like this pair located opposite the historic Bathurst Gaol complex some 3 kilometres from the city centre. While there is much information on the history of the prison complex constructed between 1886-1888 to the plans of architect James Barnet, little is to be found on this Queen Anne styled double storey pair with its prominent gables was presumably built later, possibly in the 1890s. It is likely that these houses provided accommodation to workers at the gaol complex.1

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  1. pg 17. Bathurst Conservation Area Review. B. J. Hickson Architect and Heritage Adviser in association page with Bathurst Regional Council. September 2007

Bowen Terrace: 3-25 Bathurst Road. Orange, New South Wales.

Bowen Terrace is one of the longest double storey rows you’ll find in Australia but what is unusual is its location, situated in a regional city.  Built in 1876 for Henry Thomas Bowen1 to the design of architect John Hale2, it is also a fine row of houses architecturally with its long uninterrupted hipped roofspan (except for its elegantly placed chimneys), central parapet and open grille cast iron columns.

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  1. Australian Heritage Database record 904
  2. Heritage Council NSW

Railway barracks. Lot 3 Young Street. Albury, New South Wales

The railway barracks at Albury is an important heritage registered row of 8 cottages built in 1890 as temporary rest houses for coach staff1 and believed to be the oldest of its kind remaining in Australia.

Currently in derelict condition with extensive boardings and graffiti it is protected on the NSW Heritage register. As part of the ongoing Albury railway station redevelopment urban renewal project it is being preserved for future adaptive reuse.

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  1. Albury Railway Precinct. NSW Heritage

248-252 Sloane Street. Goulburn, New South Wales

The first in our regional series on Goulburn in New South Wales, this impressive row of three impressive row of three consisting of two triple storey with attic and one single storey currently operates as the Alpine Heritage Motel. It was once a symmetrical arrangement of four terrace houses built in 1872 and modified in 1880. In 1893, the separate houses were conjoined to become a temperance hotel known as “Metropolitan Coffee Palace”1 and later “Stock’s Coffee Palace”.2 The terrace to the left was demolished at a later date and an attic level was added during conversion to accommodation in the 1990s.

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  1. Goulburn Herald.Friday 22 September 1893. pg2
  2. Alpine Heritage Hotel. About Us. Accessed 17/08/2014
Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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