Posts Tagged ‘polychrome’

57-71 Napier Street, Essendon. Melbourne, Victoria

This impressive row of eight double storey boom style polychrome terraces, captured by Alastair Lamont, is situated close to the “Windy Hill” Essendon football ground (home of AFL’s Essendon Bombers). Suprisingly for such a rare substantial suburban row, these homes are not even afforded local heritage protection under the Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme.1  Though they appear to be generally well looked after and highly sought after.

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  1. Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme

45-53 Chaucer Street, Moonee Ponds. Melbourne, Victoria

We’re extremely lucky to have such an avid readership and one passionate reader Ian Macwhirter, responded to our call for contributions with a photo and well written piece about a beautiful boom style freestanding terraces of Chaucer Street in Moonee Pond and provided permission to publish them here. Ian writes:
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57-61 Eaglehawk Road, Ironbark. Bendigo, Victoria

As a lover of both the gold rush city of Bendigo and the variety of terraced housing to be found there it is suprising to find that while heritage overlays exist across most of Bendigo, this single storey row of three homes simply named “Terraces” in suburban Ironbark is afforded no heritage protection.  This is despite an Ironbark heritage study being published as recently as 2010.1

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  1. Ironbark Heritage Study 2010

Dorset Terrace: 136-144 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania

As far as terraces go, Launceston is definitely one of Australia’s most suprising cities.  Its inner streets could be straight out of inner Sydney or Melbourne, all in a city a tenth the size of Adelaide such was the popularity of this housing style during its boom period.  Despite all this, almost all prominent texts on the subject point to one example, Alpha Terrace (which will be posted in due course possibly due to its bizarre mix of Sydney and Melbourne idiosyncrasies), though in my personal opinion there are many more notable examples of the style, some on the same St John Street stretch, such as the spectacular heritage listed1 “Dorset Terrace”2 a row of five homes erected in 1888 and likely  named after Dorset county in south west England, possibly overlooked due to its self aggrandizing Melbourne style.

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  1. Launceston City Council Schedule 2 Heritage Listed properties
  2. National Trust of Australia (Tasmania) database

17-23 Catherine Street. Maitland, New South Wales

Maitland is one of those regional heritage cities that definitely punches above its weight when it comes to terraces. The city has some good examples of both double and single storey terrace housing that have their own regional variation and flavour. This row of four terraces in Catherine Street reminds me of many from Adelaide, though it is particularly interesting for its detail and polychrome brickwork and refined use of ironwork verandah decoration …

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114-116 Grant Street, Golden Point. Ballarat, Victoria

This pair of semi-detached weatherboard terraces in Golden Point close to Canadian Creek, just south of the Ballarat CBD has an exceptionally rare feature of such houses in Australia, northern European style clipped or half-hipped gables.  Combined with their projective eaves and brackets and other timber decorative detail and mouldings (including six panelled timber Victorian style doors surrounded by sidelights, fanlight and paired double hung windows), bullnosed verandahs, iron lace fringe and brackets and tall polychrome brick chimney and party walls, this is a most distinctive pair of cottages.

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286-302 Jones Street, Pyrmont. Sydney, New South Wales

Set high in Pyrmont’s hills, this is one of two long and similarly designed but distinct rows of single storey cottages, like its neighbours, this row of nine is notable for its polychrome treatment and Queen Anne inspired gable design.  Built in the late 1890s, sometime after 1897, the homes first appear in council rate books around 1901.1  The entire row was owned by J E Kin and let at £35.2

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  1. City of Sydney Assessment books 1896-1901
  2. ibid
Recent Discussion
  • Bryan Stralow: As a restoration company working throughout VIC, we see all types of construction issues and...
  • Faith Griffiths: The property 4 Collett St Kensington was in 1931 Gipps Ward Melbourne Hospital. (information copied...
  • Georgia: Does anyone know who currently owns these terraces? They are very iconic on Ormond St and seem to be full of...
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