Posts Tagged ‘queen anne’

267-269 Browning Street. Bathurst, New South Wales

Bathurst is one of those rare Australian cities where you’ll find terrace houses on almost every street near the centre of town. Its also a place where you’ll find out of the way terraces like this pair located opposite the historic Bathurst Gaol complex some 3 kilometres from the city centre. While there is much information on the history of the prison complex constructed between 1886-1888 to the plans of architect James Barnet, little is to be found on this Queen Anne styled double storey pair with its prominent gables was presumably built later, possibly in the 1890s. It is likely that these houses provided accommodation to workers at the gaol complex.1

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  1. pg 17. Bathurst Conservation Area Review. B. J. Hickson Architect and Heritage Adviser in association page with Bathurst Regional Council. September 2007

286-302 Jones Street, Pyrmont. Sydney, New South Wales

Set high in Pyrmont’s hills, this is one of two long and similarly designed but distinct rows of single storey cottages, like its neighbours, this row of nine is notable for its polychrome treatment and Queen Anne inspired gable design.  Built in the late 1890s, sometime after 1897, the homes first appear in council rate books around 1901.1  The entire row was owned by J E Kin and let at £35.2

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  1. City of Sydney Assessment books 1896-1901
  2. ibid

77-79 Grey Street, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This architecturally fascinating eclectic double storey terraced pair located on once fashionable but now seedy St Kilda Hill features aspects of both Federation and Queen Anne styles merged with the terrace house idiom with its distinctive “blood and bandage” red brick and cream render. A picturesque effect is achieved through the central gable parapet along with the steeply pitched slate roof high chimneys with their terracotta pots. Dating to 1892, the residences were built for Gavan Shaw, a wine merchant who owned and lived in a neighbouring mansion. For many years, however, it operated as a backpacker hostel known as “St Kilda Lodge”.

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57-69 Spensely Street, Clifton Hill. Melbourne, Victoria

The Clifton Hill estate was developed in the 1870s and with its own railway station opening in 1888 quickly sprouted a number of boom terrace rows.  This row of seven (including corner shop) erected the same year in the Queen Anne style and is one of the most consistent and richly decorated in suburban Melbourne. They were developed by T Smith for Charles Abbott in 18881

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  1. Collingwood Heritage Study Review 1996

22-26 Lilydale Grove, Hawthorn East. Melbourne, Victoria (demolished 2011)

Formerly a row of four, the remaining three of this row of single storey Queen Anne terraced cottages tells the sad tale of heritage in Melbourne’s Hawthorn which is being assailed by development from all directions.  Just a stones throw from the magnificent Auburn Road precinct reknowned for its late Victorian streetscapes, this row however has no heritage protection and it shows.  One of the end terraces (28) has already been demolished to become a rear access driveway for a showroom/factory complete with a lovely barb wire fence.  The row is unfortunately heavily obscured by evergreen shrubs.  The terrace pictured (number 26) which although unoccupied and derelect is in the most original condition, but currently advertised for sale as a development site.

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10 Garsed Street. Bendigo, Victoria

I discovered this delightful semi-detached pair of late Victorian terraces while wandering from the train station to Bendigo’s central business district.  The first suprise of my investigation of this great little pair of rare picturesque Queen Anne/Rustic Gothic terraces was its unrestored condition, the second was its lack of any heritage status in an area which is being rapidly redeveloped.  The two are currently on one title and adaptively reused as offices.  An unfortunately placed tree makes capturing the pair in one photo impossible.

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Bondi, Como and Manly 44-48 Carlisle Street, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This small row of three single storey terraces named for Sydney harbourside suburbs is an interesting transitional style between Victorian and Edwardian displaying a compact arrangement of eclectic features. The terraces have iron lacework and slate roof tiles of high Victorian terraces, but the red brick and gables of the Queen Anne style in a symmetrical Palladian layout.

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Recent Discussion
  • Bryan Stralow: As a restoration company working throughout VIC, we see all types of construction issues and...
  • Faith Griffiths: The property 4 Collett St Kensington was in 1931 Gipps Ward Melbourne Hospital. (information copied...
  • Georgia: Does anyone know who currently owns these terraces? They are very iconic on Ormond St and seem to be full of...
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