Posts Tagged ‘row of eight’

Archbishop’s Row: 18-32 Catherine Street, Subiaco. Perth, Western Australia

Subiaco is probably best known for its cricket and Australian rules stadium, though just around the corner are some excellent examples of terraced housing. Built in 1904, this row of eight Italianate style terrace homes presents as two rows of four homes and is significant on a number of accounts.  Firstly it is a rare architectural bearer of the emblem of the black swan, a symbol of Western

Australia (formerly the Swan River colony) which appears on the two centre pediments of each row. It is not known where the name originated.1 The row also features a rare cast iron balustrade panel and is a late follower of a style made popular in the eastern states during the Victorian era.

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  1.  City of Subiaco walking tours

57-71 Napier Street, Essendon. Melbourne, Victoria

This impressive row of eight double storey boom style polychrome terraces, captured by Alastair Lamont, is situated close to the “Windy Hill” Essendon football ground (home of AFL’s Essendon Bombers). Suprisingly for such a rare substantial suburban row, these homes are not even afforded local heritage protection under the Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme.1  Though they appear to be generally well looked after and highly sought after.

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  1. Mooney Valley Council Planning Scheme

Shakspeare Terrace: 329-343 Punt Road. Richmond, Victoria

Shakspeare Terrace (an obvious if curious mispelling of the famous Shakespeare) is a row of eight double storey Victorian Italianate terraces positioned as one of the most visible in Melbourne commanding a prime position between the Punt Road Oval (and iconic Melbourne Cricket Ground) and Richmond railway station, it is also one of the most sadly neglected terraces in Melbourne.

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165-171 Australia Street, Camperdown. Sydney, New South Wales

This row of eight double storey terrace houses has a former corner store on its end terrace situated on the corner of Lands Lane.  The row runs along Australia Street between Federation Lane and Lands Lane. The houses themselves are built up to the property line on the street with their double storey verandahs.  There are parapets on each house in the Melbourne style, however they stagger up the hills either singularly or in pairs in typical Sydney fashion.  The parapets hide the steeple of large gabled corrugated iron roofs with chimneys.  They have a central raised curve simulating a semi-circular pediment atop a set of string courses and a circle motif with a heavy cornice below.   The party walls are decorated with scrolls at the upper level and acanthus leaves and scrolls at the lower level.

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182-196 Glen Eira Road, Elsternwick. Melbourne, Victoria

At first glance this row of eight terraces opposite Caulfield Grammar School in Elsternwick looks like it may have been an interwar or postwar anachronism.  Even a second glance.  However there are some giveaways that this is actually an extreme makeover of a row of Victorian terraces.  The original terraces have been stripped bare almost beyond recognition with verandah roof removed, new squared concrete balconies, rendered fences and new metal balcony railings.  The overall form, however is Victorian, with what remains of the window surrounds and chimneys most intact.  What were probably classical pediments on the parapet have become boxy references to the older terrace style complete with nostalgic gas lamps which look very much out of place.  The parapet once concealed a gable style corrugated iron roof on each of the individual terraces which is now exposed.

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51-65 Station Street, Newtown. Sydney, New South Wales

This row of eight single storey Italianate style Sydney terraced houses marching up a slight include displays some fairly unique attributes.  Their most interesting feature is the prominent arched Italianate style doorways with their elaborate acanthus mouldings and the prominent party walls and chimneys.

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430-444 Wattle Street, Ultimo. Sydney, New South Wales

These sandstone terraces probably date back to the early 1860s, probably when new buildng codes were introduced for high party walls.  The row of eight houses are quite Georgian in their layout, even though they feature the Victorian cast iron lacework (albeit restrained) including balustrade, brackets and short fringe on the upper level and brackets (some missing) and palisade fences at ground level.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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