Posts Tagged ‘row of five’

Wellington Terrace: 9-15 Wellington Street. Launceston, Tasmania

Launceston is blessed with a wide variety of terrace styles. Wellington Terrace, a row of five homes exhibits a particularly rare variation with its prominent double storey loggia, a terrace style more common in places such as Drummond Street Carlton or East Melbourne. Architecturally it makes a striking statement with minimal ornament, apart from its rythmic row of arches, Italianate balustrade, pilasters and cornice treatment. The loggia and verandah dating to 1911 is likely an addition to the front of an earlier Victorian era terrace given that other architectural features including windows, doors and their mouldings appear to date to the late 1870s to mid 1880s. Another striking feature is its central narrow arched carriageway topped by its pediment name plate which bears its name ‘Wellington Terrace’.

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Dorset Terrace: 136-144 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania

As far as terraces go, Launceston is definitely one of Australia’s most suprising cities.  Its inner streets could be straight out of inner Sydney or Melbourne, all in a city a tenth the size of Adelaide such was the popularity of this housing style during its boom period.  Despite all this, almost all prominent texts on the subject point to one example, Alpha Terrace (which will be posted in due course possibly due to its bizarre mix of Sydney and Melbourne idiosyncrasies), though in my personal opinion there are many more notable examples of the style, some on the same St John Street stretch, such as the spectacular heritage listed1 “Dorset Terrace”2 a row of five homes erected in 1888 and likely  named after Dorset county in south west England, possibly overlooked due to its self aggrandizing Melbourne style.

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  1. Launceston City Council Schedule 2 Heritage Listed properties
  2. National Trust of Australia (Tasmania) database

4-16 Burton Street, Glebe. Sydney, New South Wales

Glebe, like Paddington is one of those areas where you can almost get lost in the uniformity of the long stretches of double storey terraces.  Burton Street, set near the railway line, while not possessing many homes of great individual character is typically Sydney, but refreshingly different in its Victorian era charm with its narrow rising aspect and hodge podge of double and single storey terraces and styles.  The longest row in the street is this unnamed row of five, erected in 1881.

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8-14 Morang Road, Hawthorn. Melbourne, Victoria

Despite being some of the architecturally most impressive in the area, this row of five double storey Hawthorn (polychrome) brick houses is scarcely mentioned in official heritage studies, particularly the Morang Road precinct1, although neighbouring single storey terraces are.  Perhaps it is assumed.  In any case these boom style Italianate terraces were erected in 1887 (as indicated on the parapet) as a speculative development, exploiting the proximity to Hawthorn railway station which had increased in prominence with the line’s extension to Camberwell.

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  1. Hawthorn Heritage. 1997

Lorne Terrace: 83-87 Mitchell Street, Glebe. Sydney, New South Wales

Lorne Terrace was built in 1875 by William Jarrett1.  Notable for the use of the post-Regency Georgian style, a style fairly common in Glebe for the Industrial Building Society2. Architecturally it features the distinctive simplistic gable roof form with plain window ledges with double hung six pane windows and a single storey verandah with a concave striped corrugated iron roof with a small step down every couple of houses with chimneys in between.  The individual houses are defined by their doorways and the rainwater downpipes which descend their facades. This row is part of the Glebe Estate, a precinct heritage registered for its extensive stands of Victorian terraces including post-Regency examples such as this.

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  1. pg 158. Glebe Project. Australian Government Publishing Service. Canberra, 1980
  2. ibid

52-60 Argyle Place, Millers Point. Sydney, New South Wales

Although it has the outward appearance of the 1880s, this row of five Victorian era terraces is one of Sydney’s earliest, dating as far back as 1842. They were recently sold by NSW public housing for a handsome sum of money to private owners. The terraces were built by whaler Charles Grimes in the early 1840s and were depicted in artist Conrad Marten’s work in 1843. The row was completed sometime around 1848 and were originally modest shingle roofed cottages with single storey verandahs and originally had uninterrupted harbour views.1

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Hortonbridge Terrace: 61-69 Victoria Street, Potts Point. Sydney, New South Wales

This grand triple storey row of five houses erected in 1890 situated near Potts Point’s famous McElhone stairs is currently known as Waratah Apartments with a serviced apartments complex integrated behind the facades.

The state heritage listed terrace is notable for its rich classical styled embellishment.   Victorian row houses such as this heralded Pott’s Point’s status as the ‘Regent’s Park of Sydney’.

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Recent Discussion
  • Bryan Stralow: As a restoration company working throughout VIC, we see all types of construction issues and...
  • Faith Griffiths: The property 4 Collett St Kensington was in 1931 Gipps Ward Melbourne Hospital. (information copied...
  • Georgia: Does anyone know who currently owns these terraces? They are very iconic on Ormond St and seem to be full of...
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