Posts Tagged ‘row of four’

8-14 Lithgow Street. Lithgow, New South Wales

Lithgow is one of the few places in the Blue Mountains area where you can find terraced housing and many of the working class terraces there served as housing for the mining and industry in the 19th century. This row of four double storey terraces is situated in the Pottery Estate and likely dates to the 1880s, most probably serving as homes for those working at the local colliery which opened in 1873.1  Architecturally they are interesting for the materials and lack of significant ornament.

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  1.  NSW Heritage record 1960330

Pembridge Terrace: 49-55 Stevenson Place. Newcastle, New South Wales

Central Newcastle has some distinctive gems of terrace housing and this one, built in 1900, and situated on the corner of Stevenson Place and Telford Street with views over the foreshore park and the Hunter River is definitely one of them. The eclectic Anglo-Dutch, Queen-Anne and Mannerist styled red brick terrace likely named for the village in Herefordshire England, has a number of quite quirky features including the way it addresses its corner site, art-noveau styled signwriting and mannerist elements.

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Wilson’s Terrace: 129-135 High Street, Prahran. Melbourne, Victoria

This row of four double storey Victorian filligree terraces has been adaptively used as professional suites. Given the lack of current heritage protection offered (as of 2014 it is not covered by a heritage overlay under the Stonnington planning Scheme1. Given the position of the signage on the segmental arch of the parapet which bears the name “Wilson’s Terrace”, one would think this terrace was originally a row of five with two houses on either side of the mid-terrace. However, its first mention in The Argus in 1881 advertises it as a row of four houses, each with seven rooms.2 Tenders were called for its construction in 1884 by architects W H Elleker.3 The houses were originally numbered 15-27 High Street.4

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  1. Stonnington Planning Scheme 04HO
  2. The Argus. Friday 28 October 1881. Advertising, pg. 12
  3. The Argus. Thursday 7 August 1884. Advertising, pg. 3
  4. The Argus. Friday 20 March 1885. pg. 7

17-23 Catherine Street. Maitland, New South Wales

Maitland is one of those regional heritage cities that definitely punches above its weight when it comes to terraces. The city has some good examples of both double and single storey terrace housing that have their own regional variation and flavour. This row of four terraces in Catherine Street reminds me of many from Adelaide, though it is particularly interesting for its detail and polychrome brickwork and refined use of ironwork verandah decoration …

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93-97 Abercrombie Street, Chippendale. Sydney, New South Wales

This row of four unnamed terraces in Sydney’s Chippendale adjacent to the Shannon Hotel (built in 1912) is difficult to date and unfortunately not on any official heritage list. Interesting for their subdued, almost Georgian architectural appearance, while typical of 1860s industrial housing in Ultimo, modifications over the years reveal some of the mystery to their past.

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109-115 Paisley Street, Footscray. Melbourne, Victoria

The most distinctive feature of this row of four Footscray cottages is their overly tall triangular parapets which cascading with scrolls and central arch seashell motif is both a nod to the Dutch style and effectively hide the hip and gable roof behind. It is most likely that before painting, they were red brick and cream painted render typical of the 1890s.   For many years from the 1930s to the 1950s they were sold as a single investment row12 as such its probably a miracle that they have survived to the present day in an area which had seen so much change. There is no doubt that terraces are now exceptionally rare in this area. Whether they, along with their neighbouring terraces escape the current extensive redevelopment of Footscray with no heritage protection or overlay at any level3 remains to be seen. There is no doubt that terraces are now exceptionally rare in this area.

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  1. The Argus. Advertising pg 3. 1st February, 1936
  2. Williamstown Chronicle. Advertising pg6 7th October, 1949
  3. Maribyrnong Planning Scheme Ho08

86-92 Union Street, Pyrmont. Sydney, New South Wales

This row of four double storey shophouses in Sydney’s Pyrmont were originally terrace houses built in 1890 but they’ve suffered quite a lot in the conversion.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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