Posts Tagged ‘row of two’

77-79 Grey Street, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This architecturally fascinating eclectic double storey terraced pair located on once fashionable but now seedy St Kilda Hill features aspects of both Federation and Queen Anne styles merged with the terrace house idiom with its distinctive “blood and bandage” red brick and cream render. A picturesque effect is achieved through the central gable parapet along with the steeply pitched slate roof high chimneys with their terracotta pots. Dating to 1892, the residences were built for Gavan Shaw, a wine merchant who owned and lived in a neighbouring mansion. For many years, however, it operated as a backpacker hostel known as “St Kilda Lodge”.

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Riversleigh: 3-5 Nicholson Street. Bairnsdale, Victoria

Riversleigh is Bairnsdale’s most majestic pair of terrace houses. Built in 1883-4 and attributed to R T Vincent1 tThe semi-detached pair was built to maximise views across the magnificent Mitchell River on the northern edge of the central business district. It is part of a heritage precinct which includes neighbouring Wahroonga mansion and the Bairnsdale courthouse.

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  1. National Trust file B5462

Callender House: 355 Wickham Terrace, Spring Hill. Brisbane, Queensland

This little pair of attached houses dates back to 1863 and was designed by the reknowned local architect Robert Smith Dods1. Originally each house was comprised of five rooms and a kitchen.2 The building later became known as Callender House and had long been associated with members of the church.

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  1. Queensland Heritage record 600169
  2. ibid

13-15 James Street. Port Fairy, Victoria

Port Fairy, known as Belfast (after the Irish city) during the early Victorian era was one of the colony’s early thriving coastal settlements and was much the same size as it is today.  So it is not really suprising to find quite a number of  semi-detached and terraced “cottages” about the town.  Unlike other Victorian cities, however due to the 1850s origins, the majority of Port Fairy’s cottages are mostly a very subdued Georgian style of double fronted home  (influenced by Irish architecture) similar to those found in southern Tasmania.  That makes this pair all the more interesting as it is probably more akin to the South Australian colonial terrace with its simple wooden verandah decorations.

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77-79 Templeton Street. Castlemaine, Victoria

Of the few examples of terraced housing in the gold rush town of Castlemaine, this is possibly the most distinctly Australian of them with its iron lacework and verandah form. During the gold rush the population of Mount Alexander (as it was then known) was greater than Melbourne.  Confidence that it would continue to grow ensured that a smatterings of terraces emerged in the inner city streets during the 1860s and 1870s, however after the gold dried up more quickly than expected, the form of housing became an oddity in what was a provincial city.

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Ray Villa and Harris Villa: 45-47 Waterloo Crescent, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This exuberant semi-detached pair of Victorian Italianate villas, set back from the street, is one of two such pairs in close proximity (the other I will post at a future date).  Disappointingly while other nearby properties do, neither of these pairs has any heritage status under the City of Port Phillip planning scheme. There are several features of this terrace which are architecturally interesting, apart from the general mannerist baroque composition of the parapet, it is rare to see the diagonal criss-cross lattice where you’d normally expect a classical balustrade on an Australian terrace.  

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10 Garsed Street. Bendigo, Victoria

I discovered this delightful semi-detached pair of late Victorian terraces while wandering from the train station to Bendigo’s central business district.  The first suprise of my investigation of this great little pair of rare picturesque Queen Anne/Rustic Gothic terraces was its unrestored condition, the second was its lack of any heritage status in an area which is being rapidly redeveloped.  The two are currently on one title and adaptively reused as offices.  An unfortunately placed tree makes capturing the pair in one photo impossible.

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Recent Discussion
  • admin: I think what this shows PeteS is 343 with its pre-modified facade (complete with the tiny strip of balustrade...
  • Crystal: More info on Simon Harvey please Regards, Crystal
  • Nicole: Hi there Hoping you may have some further details about these terraces. I am moving into 184 soon and...
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