Posts Tagged ‘sandstone’

Young Street Terraces: 36-42 Young Street. Sydney, New South Wales

Sydney’s central business district once contained a great many rows of substantial terraces, many of three or more stories.  Many of them were mixed use. Today the landscape is far different but fortunately this row, known simply as “Young Street Terraces” has survived being one of few reminders of the Victorian boom era in the heart of town.   The terrace has almost always been a government building, occupying the site of what was originally government house.  Perhaps this is the reason why it stands on land around it is now occupied by skyscrapers. In 1851, the site was subdivided and in 1874 Joseph Paul Walker erected the terraces as offices leasing them to government departments.1

More information »

  1. Heritage NSW file 834054

Specimen Cottage: 178-180 Hargreaves Street. Bendigo, Victoria

Specimen Cottage, the oldest terrace house in Bendigo is also reputed to be the oldest house and possibly oldest buildings in the city.  The row of two sandstone ashlar cottages was built in two stages.  The first single storey double fronted cottage was erected in 1856 by local stonemason James Brierley.  The name and date are enscribed in stone above the doorway.  In 1861 he extended it with a matching double storey cottage.

More information »

Alfred Terrace: 37-47 Kent Street, Millers Point. Sydney, New South Wales

Alfred Terrace (or Alfred’s Terrace) is a row of six double storey (with additional basement level) Georgian style sandstone block terraces forming part of a very intact early Victorian streetscape on Sydney’s Kent Street. Alfred’s Terrace was built between 1868 and 1870 for Sir George Wigram Allen prominent Sydney solicitor and politician.1

More information »

  1. pg 178 CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES Housing NSW Properties Millers Point VOLUME TWO Final Draft October 2004

257-260 South Terrace, Adelaide. South Australia

This row of four double storey regency style sandstone terraces has been adaptively reused as a Disability Information and Resource Centre and has recently been restored and refurbished.

More information »

Pembroke Terrace: 91-101 Buckingham Street, Surry Hills. Sydney, New South Wales

Pembroke Terrace is a row of six Georgian style sandstone terraced houses was built around 1860 and were among the first wave of terraced housing in Surry Hills. Originally part of a row of 21 houses completed in 1871 most of which has since been demolished, clear photographs of the terrace soon after its completion are some of the best preserved images of the nature of early speculative development in Sydney1 2, even illustrate the use of cast iron bootscrapers and early rainwater systems and attracted a mix of middle class and working class occupants.3

More information »

  1. Pg 6. Terrace Houses in Australia. Howells, T & Morris, C. Sydney, 1999
  2. Pg 40. Identifying Australian Architecture. Apperly, R. Irving, R. Reynolds, P. Sydney 1994
  3. Pg 28. The Australian Terrace House. Turner, B. Sydney, 1995

37-53 Grove Street, Birchgrove. Sydney, New South Wales

This is a long row of eight double storey sandstone terraces terminates in a shophouse end terrace.  While the parapet of the terrace houses is quite plain, it effectively hides the roof and chimneys, stepping slightly to follow the gradual incline of the street.  Like many inner Sydney corner stores the corner store of the row has a bevel with a door entry facing the corner on an angle.  The parapet on this section is much higher and more pronounced with a high curved motif, although still plain of the facade.  The corner store has a spectacular large wood lattice balcony projecting over the footpath.  Whether this was an original feature, I’m not sure.

More information »

430-444 Wattle Street, Ultimo. Sydney, New South Wales

These sandstone terraces probably date back to the early 1860s, probably when new buildng codes were introduced for high party walls.  The row of eight houses are quite Georgian in their layout, even though they feature the Victorian cast iron lacework (albeit restrained) including balustrade, brackets and short fringe on the upper level and brackets (some missing) and palisade fences at ground level.

More information »

Recent Discussion
  • Bryan Stralow: As a restoration company working throughout VIC, we see all types of construction issues and...
  • Faith Griffiths: The property 4 Collett St Kensington was in 1931 Gipps Ward Melbourne Hospital. (information copied...
  • Georgia: Does anyone know who currently owns these terraces? They are very iconic on Ormond St and seem to be full of...
Tags