Posts Tagged ‘semi-detached’

267-269 Browning Street. Bathurst, New South Wales

Bathurst is one of those rare Australian cities where you’ll find terrace houses on almost every street near the centre of town. Its also a place where you’ll find out of the way terraces like this pair located opposite the historic Bathurst Gaol complex some 3 kilometres from the city centre. While there is much information on the history of the prison complex constructed between 1886-1888 to the plans of architect James Barnet, little is to be found on this Queen Anne styled double storey pair with its prominent gables was presumably built later, possibly in the 1890s. It is likely that these houses provided accommodation to workers at the gaol complex.1

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  1. pg 17. Bathurst Conservation Area Review. B. J. Hickson Architect and Heritage Adviser in association page with Bathurst Regional Council. September 2007

58-60 Raglan Street. Daylesford, Victoria

Situated just under a kilometre from both the main street and railway station of what is Australia’s most popular spa town is this very rare pair of single storey double fronted Victorian terraces.

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114-116 Grant Street, Golden Point. Ballarat, Victoria

This pair of semi-detached weatherboard terraces in Golden Point close to Canadian Creek, just south of the Ballarat CBD has an exceptionally rare feature of such houses in Australia, northern European style clipped or half-hipped gables.  Combined with their projective eaves and brackets and other timber decorative detail and mouldings (including six panelled timber Victorian style doors surrounded by sidelights, fanlight and paired double hung windows), bullnosed verandahs, iron lace fringe and brackets and tall polychrome brick chimney and party walls, this is a most distinctive pair of cottages.

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77-79 Grey Street, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This architecturally fascinating eclectic double storey terraced pair located on once fashionable but now seedy St Kilda Hill features aspects of both Federation and Queen Anne styles merged with the terrace house idiom with its distinctive “blood and bandage” red brick and cream render. A picturesque effect is achieved through the central gable parapet along with the steeply pitched slate roof high chimneys with their terracotta pots. Dating to 1892, the residences were built for Gavan Shaw, a wine merchant who owned and lived in a neighbouring mansion. For many years, however, it operated as a backpacker hostel known as “St Kilda Lodge”.

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105 High Street. Ararat, Victoria

Attached housing is rare in Ararat, a gold rush city, however a handful of single storey examples can still be found, mostly on the main roads leading into town. This particular pair can be found north of the Western Highway between King and Princes Street and backs onto the railway reserve within very close proximity to the railway station.

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Riversleigh: 3-5 Nicholson Street. Bairnsdale, Victoria

Riversleigh is Bairnsdale’s most majestic pair of terrace houses. Built in 1883-4 and attributed to R T Vincent1 tThe semi-detached pair was built to maximise views across the magnificent Mitchell River on the northern edge of the central business district. It is part of a heritage precinct which includes neighbouring Wahroonga mansion and the Bairnsdale courthouse.

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  1. National Trust file B5462

13-15 James Street. Port Fairy, Victoria

Port Fairy, known as Belfast (after the Irish city) during the early Victorian era was one of the colony’s early thriving coastal settlements and was much the same size as it is today.  So it is not really suprising to find quite a number of  semi-detached and terraced “cottages” about the town.  Unlike other Victorian cities, however due to the 1850s origins, the majority of Port Fairy’s cottages are mostly a very subdued Georgian style of double fronted home  (influenced by Irish architecture) similar to those found in southern Tasmania.  That makes this pair all the more interesting as it is probably more akin to the South Australian colonial terrace with its simple wooden verandah decorations.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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