Posts Tagged ‘slate roof’

77-79 Grey Street, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This architecturally fascinating eclectic double storey terraced pair located on once fashionable but now seedy St Kilda Hill features aspects of both Federation and Queen Anne styles merged with the terrace house idiom with its distinctive “blood and bandage” red brick and cream render. A picturesque effect is achieved through the central gable parapet along with the steeply pitched slate roof high chimneys with their terracotta pots. Dating to 1892, the residences were built for Gavan Shaw, a wine merchant who owned and lived in a neighbouring mansion. For many years, however, it operated as a backpacker hostel known as “St Kilda Lodge”.

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27-33 Hawke Street. West Melbourne, Victoria

While architecturally simple and missing their iron lacework decorations, these four single storey row houses are of a style that is actually quite rare in Melbourne but proliferated in the 1870s in inner Sydney areas such as Glebe and Newtown where extensive rows can be found (example 31-42 Mitchell Street, Glebe). What is distinctive about this style is not the transverse gable configuration, but the combination of the blade party walls, central chimney, slate tile and banded paint (cream and maroon) concave corrugated iron verandahs referred to as Post-regency in Sydney. Constructed between 1870-1872, they were built for John Marley who lived at number 33 and remained their owner until the 1890s.1

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  1. City of Melbourne i-Heritage

77-79 Templeton Street. Castlemaine, Victoria

Of the few examples of terraced housing in the gold rush town of Castlemaine, this is possibly the most distinctly Australian of them with its iron lacework and verandah form. During the gold rush the population of Mount Alexander (as it was then known) was greater than Melbourne.  Confidence that it would continue to grow ensured that a smatterings of terraces emerged in the inner city streets during the 1860s and 1870s, however after the gold dried up more quickly than expected, the form of housing became an oddity in what was a provincial city.

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Bondi, Como and Manly 44-48 Carlisle Street, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This small row of three single storey terraces named for Sydney harbourside suburbs is an interesting transitional style between Victorian and Edwardian displaying a compact arrangement of eclectic features. The terraces have iron lacework and slate roof tiles of high Victorian terraces, but the red brick and gables of the Queen Anne style in a symmetrical Palladian layout.

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42-44 McKillop Street, Geelong. Victoria

This pair of double storey semi-detached houses built in 1882 for Geelong builder John Charles Taylor of J.C. Taylor & Sons Pty Ltd and is attributed by City of Greater Geelong to architect Alexander Davidson1 is notable for its combination of stunning brick polychrome and iron lacework.

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  1. Greater Geelong City
    conservation study HO1641

Pembroke Terrace: 91-101 Buckingham Street, Surry Hills. Sydney, New South Wales

Pembroke Terrace is a row of six Georgian style sandstone terraced houses was built around 1860 and were among the first wave of terraced housing in Surry Hills. Originally part of a row of 21 houses completed in 1871 most of which has since been demolished, clear photographs of the terrace soon after its completion are some of the best preserved images of the nature of early speculative development in Sydney1 2, even illustrate the use of cast iron bootscrapers and early rainwater systems and attracted a mix of middle class and working class occupants.3

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  1. Pg 6. Terrace Houses in Australia. Howells, T & Morris, C. Sydney, 1999
  2. Pg 40. Identifying Australian Architecture. Apperly, R. Irving, R. Reynolds, P. Sydney 1994
  3. Pg 28. The Australian Terrace House. Turner, B. Sydney, 1995

21 Hill Street, Hawthorn. Melbourne, Victoria

21 Hill Street is a richly detailed double storey house which is built in the terrace style although freestanding. This grand terrace features a hipped slate roof culminated in a central chimney above bracketed eaves – a design theme while repeated elsewhere, along with the verandah, makes an impressive statement here.

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Recent Discussion
  • Bryan Stralow: As a restoration company working throughout VIC, we see all types of construction issues and...
  • Faith Griffiths: The property 4 Collett St Kensington was in 1931 Gipps Ward Melbourne Hospital. (information copied...
  • Georgia: Does anyone know who currently owns these terraces? They are very iconic on Ormond St and seem to be full of...
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