Posts Tagged ‘sydney’

Voilet Terrace: 1-5 King Street, Randwick. Sydney, New South Wales

Violet terrace, completed in 1884 adjacent to Randwick Racecource is a row of three narrow double storey terraces in an Italianate style atypical of Sydney terraces.
The terrace is distinctive for its unrendered facade and restrained, but relatively intact ornament.
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St Aubyn’s Terrace. 255-265 High Street. Penrith, New South Wales

St Aubyn’s is a row of six south facing double storey terrace homes erected in 1886 opposite St Stephen’s. Terraces today are a rare sight in Penrith, although others built during the period, such as a similar row of three Carlton Terrace and terraces along nearby rows in Henry Street were later demolished. An interesting feature of the central parapet is the initials ‘JB’, apparently of the builder John Brown.1 Though constructed of brick, with the rendered mustard colour of the parapet, the terraces have a solid appearance mimicking the local sandstone buildings of an earlier period.
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  1. City of Penrith archive item 003115

Horbury Terrace: 171-173 Macquarie Street. Sydney, New South Wales

Once in a row of either seven or eight, this pair is all that remains of the Georgian revival (or Colonnial Regency) styled Horbury Terrace. Named after Horbury in Yorkshire England, which was the home of owner Thomas Holt it was built for Ouseley Condell. The houses were triple storey with basements. Details of its construction vary by source with some sources quoting a construction date of 18361 while the official plaque on the building from the Royal Australian Historical Society states 1842, engravings of it date to 1848.2

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  1. Howells, T. , Morris, M. Terrace Houses in Australia. Lansdowne Publishing, Sydney. 1999. pg 29.
  2. RAHS

4-16 Burton Street, Glebe. Sydney, New South Wales

Glebe, like Paddington is one of those areas where you can almost get lost in the uniformity of the long stretches of double storey terraces.  Burton Street, set near the railway line, while not possessing many homes of great individual character is typically Sydney, but refreshingly different in its Victorian era charm with its narrow rising aspect and hodge podge of double and single storey terraces and styles.  The longest row in the street is this unnamed row of five, erected in 1881.

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3-5 Weynton Street, Annandale. Sydney, New South Wales

Situated between a large block of 50s walk up flats and a Victorian villa on Weynton street is this vestigal pair of Victorian terraces which marches up to Piper Lane. Annandale is a surburb best known for its “Witches Houses” and this terrace stands out from nearby terraces are mostly freestanding terraces and single storey cottages. What makes this terrace interesting is some unusual features which set it apart from many others.

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93-97 Abercrombie Street, Chippendale. Sydney, New South Wales

This row of four unnamed terraces in Sydney’s Chippendale adjacent to the Shannon Hotel (built in 1912) is difficult to date and unfortunately not on any official heritage list. Interesting for their subdued, almost Georgian architectural appearance, while typical of 1860s industrial housing in Ultimo, modifications over the years reveal some of the mystery to their past.

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286-302 Jones Street, Pyrmont. Sydney, New South Wales

Set high in Pyrmont’s hills, this is one of two long and similarly designed but distinct rows of single storey cottages, like its neighbours, this row of nine is notable for its polychrome treatment and Queen Anne inspired gable design.  Built in the late 1890s, sometime after 1897, the homes first appear in council rate books around 1901.1  The entire row was owned by J E Kin and let at £35.2

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  1. City of Sydney Assessment books 1896-1901
  2. ibid
Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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