Posts Tagged ‘triglyphs’

Dorset Terrace: 136-144 St John Street, Launceston, Tasmania

As far as terraces go, Launceston is definitely one of Australia’s most suprising cities.  Its inner streets could be straight out of inner Sydney or Melbourne, all in a city a tenth the size of Adelaide such was the popularity of this housing style during its boom period.  Despite all this, almost all prominent texts on the subject point to one example, Alpha Terrace (which will be posted in due course possibly due to its bizarre mix of Sydney and Melbourne idiosyncrasies), though in my personal opinion there are many more notable examples of the style, some on the same St John Street stretch, such as the spectacular heritage listed1 “Dorset Terrace”2 a row of five homes erected in 1888 and likely  named after Dorset county in south west England, possibly overlooked due to its self aggrandizing Melbourne style.

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  1. Launceston City Council Schedule 2 Heritage Listed properties
  2. National Trust of Australia (Tasmania) database

Ray Villa and Harris Villa: 45-47 Waterloo Crescent, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This exuberant semi-detached pair of Victorian Italianate villas, set back from the street, is one of two such pairs in close proximity (the other I will post at a future date).  Disappointingly while other nearby properties do, neither of these pairs has any heritage status under the City of Port Phillip planning scheme. There are several features of this terrace which are architecturally interesting, apart from the general mannerist baroque composition of the parapet, it is rare to see the diagonal criss-cross lattice where you’d normally expect a classical balustrade on an Australian terrace.  

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Athol and Gowrie: 330-332 Punt Road, South Yarra. Melbourne, Victoria

Athol and Gowrie, a pair of single storey Italianate terraces on Punt Road, stands bastardised as an example of what happens when you denude a terrace house.  The balconies have been removed for as long as I can remember, however the trees which once obscured these terraces from the street have been removed more recently and replaced with a paved carparking area, as has the 1960s style awning which were once over the doors and the pastel blue paint which gave it the appearance of a pokey run down cabaret venue.  The plainness of the facade without the verandah is quite evident, however there is a sense of grace in its current incarnation with its simple, almost Georgian like symmetry and cream paint accentuated by the addition of an equally minimalist cream wall.

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Recent Discussion
  • Bryan Stralow: As a restoration company working throughout VIC, we see all types of construction issues and...
  • Faith Griffiths: The property 4 Collett St Kensington was in 1931 Gipps Ward Melbourne Hospital. (information copied...
  • Georgia: Does anyone know who currently owns these terraces? They are very iconic on Ormond St and seem to be full of...
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