Posts Tagged ‘villa’

Ray Villa and Harris Villa: 45-47 Waterloo Crescent, St Kilda. Melbourne, Victoria

This exuberant semi-detached pair of Victorian Italianate villas, set back from the street, is one of two such pairs in close proximity (the other I will post at a future date).  Disappointingly while other nearby properties do, neither of these pairs has any heritage status under the City of Port Phillip planning scheme. There are several features of this terrace which are architecturally interesting, apart from the general mannerist baroque composition of the parapet, it is rare to see the diagonal criss-cross lattice where you’d normally expect a classical balustrade on an Australian terrace.  

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Oberon: 215 Lydiard Street, Soldiers Hill. Ballarat, Victoria

Oberon is a freestanding single storey Italianate villa in the terrace house style. It is adaptively reused as offices. The house features what can best be described as a highly refined florid facade. In this design, the three most important elements – parapet, verandah and openings are given maximum emphasis in detail.

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Agincourt: 13-15 Collins Street, Annandale. Sydney, New South Wales

Set within a suburb with some fantastic examples of 1880s architecture is this unusual semi-detached pair of Victorian Italianate villas named Agincourt.   Each house is asymmetrical, but the pair combines to a unique create symmetry and among the notable features are the campanile-like towers and the restrained ornament used to best effect.

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Hollyford: 57 St Vincent Place Sth, Albert Park. Melbourne, Victoria

Hollyford is a spectacular double fronted Victorian villa in the terrace style found overlooking Albert Parks beautiful St Vincents Gardens.  Built in 1873 in polychrome brick and render, this single storey terraced house features incredible detail typically associated with the Melbourne “boom style”.

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Leslie Cottage: 4 Cameron Street, Coburg. Melbourne, Victoria

Sitting all by itself, without any heritage protection and surrounded by sprawling modern factories but in remarkably good condition is this little Coburg gem.  It certainly is an unusual sight with its spectacular display of polychrome brickwork patterns of zig zags and diamond under the window, its elaborate ironwork including spiral window columns, classical verandah supports, brackets and frieze and its highly decorative parapet and party walls.  Perhaps it is a “nail house” and someone lives there or perhaps it has been adaptively used as a small office or something.

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Recent Discussion
  • Lesley Poker: Built in 1874. Originally built by a John Watson ( very wealthy) who built the one next door for his...
  • Anne: Thanks for your comment. We own one of these terraces and would be interested in any info you have.
  • Kate Van Dyck: Love this photo. One off my GG Grandfather’s lived in No 21 and died at that address. So...
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